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Malaysia seeks help from territories near Reunion to expand search area for MH370 debris

  • FILE - In this photo dated Wednesday, July 29, 2015, French police officers carry a piece of debris from a plane in Saint-Andre, Reunion Island. Malaysian officials said Sunday, Aug. 2, 2015 that they would seek help from territories near the island where a suspected piece of the missing Malaysia Airlines jet was discovered to try to find more possible debris from the plane. (AP Photo/Lucas Marie, File)

    FILE - In this photo dated Wednesday, July 29, 2015, French police officers carry a piece of debris from a plane in Saint-Andre, Reunion Island. Malaysian officials said Sunday, Aug. 2, 2015 that they would seek help from territories near the island where a suspected piece of the missing Malaysia Airlines jet was discovered to try to find more possible debris from the plane. (AP Photo/Lucas Marie, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • Workers for an association responsible for maintaining paths to Jamaica beach from being overgrown by shrubs, search the beach for possible additional airplane debris near the shore where an airplane wing part was washed up, in the early morning near to Saint-Denis  on the north coast of the Indian Ocean island of Reunion Sunday, Aug. 2, 2015. A barnacle-encrusted wing part that washed up on the remote Indian Ocean island earlier could help solve one of aviation's greatest mysteries, as investigators work to connect it to the Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 that vanished more than a year ago with 293 people aboard. (AP Photo/Fabrice Wislez)

    Workers for an association responsible for maintaining paths to Jamaica beach from being overgrown by shrubs, search the beach for possible additional airplane debris near the shore where an airplane wing part was washed up, in the early morning near to Saint-Denis on the north coast of the Indian Ocean island of Reunion Sunday, Aug. 2, 2015. A barnacle-encrusted wing part that washed up on the remote Indian Ocean island earlier could help solve one of aviation's greatest mysteries, as investigators work to connect it to the Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 that vanished more than a year ago with 293 people aboard. (AP Photo/Fabrice Wislez)  (The Associated Press)

  • Workers for an association responsible for maintaining paths to Jamaica beach from being overgrown by shrubs, search the area for possible additional airplane debris near the shore where an airplane wing part was washed up, in the early morning near to Saint-Denis  on the north coast of the Indian Ocean island of Reunion Sunday, Aug. 2, 2015. A barnacle-encrusted wing part that washed up on the remote Indian Ocean island earlier could help solve one of aviation's greatest mysteries, as investigators work to connect it to the Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 that vanished more than a year ago with 293 people aboard. (AP Photo/Fabrice Wislez)

    Workers for an association responsible for maintaining paths to Jamaica beach from being overgrown by shrubs, search the area for possible additional airplane debris near the shore where an airplane wing part was washed up, in the early morning near to Saint-Denis on the north coast of the Indian Ocean island of Reunion Sunday, Aug. 2, 2015. A barnacle-encrusted wing part that washed up on the remote Indian Ocean island earlier could help solve one of aviation's greatest mysteries, as investigators work to connect it to the Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 that vanished more than a year ago with 293 people aboard. (AP Photo/Fabrice Wislez)  (The Associated Press)

Malaysia says it's seeking help from territories near the island where a suspected piece of the missing Malaysia Airlines jet was found in order to expand the search area for plane debris.

Transport Minister Liow Tiong Lai said in a statement Sunday that the Department of Civil Aviation is reaching out to these authorities to allow experts "to conduct more substantive analysis should there be more debris coming on to land, providing us more clues to the missing aircraft."

The statement also said that the wing part found on Reunion on Wednesday has been verified by French authorities and others, including Boeing, as being from a Boeing 777. Flight 370 is the only missing 777.

A U.S. official had confirmed that same information after the wing part was found.