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Attorneys for Auschwitz survivors criticize Germany for taking too long to try SS sergeant

  • Former SS officer Oskar Groening, left, arrives at  a courtroom in Lueneburg, northern Germany, Wednesday July 8, 2015.   German prosecutors  sought a 3½-year prison sentence for the  94-year-old former SS sergeant who served at the Auschwitz death camp in Nazi-occupied Poland, saying his role there made him an accessory to murder. (Christian Charisius/Pool Photo via AP)

    Former SS officer Oskar Groening, left, arrives at a courtroom in Lueneburg, northern Germany, Wednesday July 8, 2015. German prosecutors sought a 3½-year prison sentence for the 94-year-old former SS sergeant who served at the Auschwitz death camp in Nazi-occupied Poland, saying his role there made him an accessory to murder. (Christian Charisius/Pool Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Former SS officer Oskar Groening  waits in a court room in Lueneburg, northern Germany, Wednesday July 8, 2015.   German prosecutors  sought a 3½-year prison sentence for the  94-year-old former SS sergeant who served at the Auschwitz death camp in Nazi-occupied Poland, saying his role there made him an accessory to murder. (Christian Charisius/Pool Photo via AP)

    Former SS officer Oskar Groening waits in a court room in Lueneburg, northern Germany, Wednesday July 8, 2015. German prosecutors sought a 3½-year prison sentence for the 94-year-old former SS sergeant who served at the Auschwitz death camp in Nazi-occupied Poland, saying his role there made him an accessory to murder. (Christian Charisius/Pool Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Former prisoner of Auschwitz concentration camp and plaintiff Hedy Bohm , left, and her daughter Vicky Bohm  wait in the courtroom  for the trial of former German SS officer Oskar Groening  in Lueneburg, northern Germany, Wednesday July 8 2015 Groening is charged with 300,000 counts of accessory to murder on allegations he helped the Auschwitz Nazi death camp function by sorting cash and valuables seized from Jews.  German prosecutors sought a 3½-year prison sentence for the  94-year-old former SS sergeant who served at the Auschwitz death camp in Nazi-occupied Poland, saying his role there made him an accessory to murder.  ( Christian Charisius/Pool Photovia AP)

    Former prisoner of Auschwitz concentration camp and plaintiff Hedy Bohm , left, and her daughter Vicky Bohm wait in the courtroom for the trial of former German SS officer Oskar Groening in Lueneburg, northern Germany, Wednesday July 8 2015 Groening is charged with 300,000 counts of accessory to murder on allegations he helped the Auschwitz Nazi death camp function by sorting cash and valuables seized from Jews. German prosecutors sought a 3½-year prison sentence for the 94-year-old former SS sergeant who served at the Auschwitz death camp in Nazi-occupied Poland, saying his role there made him an accessory to murder. ( Christian Charisius/Pool Photovia AP)  (The Associated Press)

Attorneys representing dozens of Auschwitz survivors and their relatives say German justice moved too slowly in bringing to trial a former SS sergeant who served at the death camp.

In closing arguments Wednesday at Oskar Groening's trial, attorney Cornelius Nestler questioned why it took 70 years after the end of World War II to put the 94-year-old on trial for 300,000 counts of accessory to murder. Nestler says it's "far too late, but not too late."

Thomas Walther, who represents 51 co-plaintiffs with Nestler, told the court Groening deserves respect for talking about his role in Auschwitz, but that survivors "remain greatly disappointed" they didn't hear him take personal responsibility.

Germany allows victims of a crime to join a case as co-plaintiffs. A verdict is expected later this month.