World

The Latest: As focus turns to Greek referendum, European markets open steadily

FILE - In this  Feb. 3, 2015, file photo, a Greek flag flies outside the Athens Stock Exchange. In 2012, financial markets were rattled by the possibility Greece would elect a left-wing government, default on their debts and drop the euro currency. In 2015, the left-wing party, Syriza, holds power in Athens. Greece actually did miss a loan payment to the International Monetary Fund late Tuesday, June 30, 2015. And the nation's future in the eurozone hinges precariously on a referendum Sunday, July 5, 2015. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris, File)

FILE - In this Feb. 3, 2015, file photo, a Greek flag flies outside the Athens Stock Exchange. In 2012, financial markets were rattled by the possibility Greece would elect a left-wing government, default on their debts and drop the euro currency. In 2015, the left-wing party, Syriza, holds power in Athens. Greece actually did miss a loan payment to the International Monetary Fund late Tuesday, June 30, 2015. And the nation's future in the eurozone hinges precariously on a referendum Sunday, July 5, 2015. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris, File)  (The Associated Press)

The latest news on Greece's financial woes (all times local):

10:23 a.m.

European stock markets have opened steady, a day after Greece's European creditors said they would not talk with the Greek government about its bailout request until after Sunday's referendum.

In Greece, most banks remain shuttered and will remain so at least until after the referendum on recent creditor proposals. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras confirmed Wednesday that the referendum would take place and that he would be backing the "No" campaign.

"The Greek government would appear to continuing its game of cat and mouse with its creditors," said Michael Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC Markets.

Soon after opening, the Stoxx 50 index of leading European shares was up 0.2 percent. The euro itself was 0.1 percent higher at $1.1066.