World

Greenpeace kicks off anti-'Gag Law' action with protest banner close to Spanish Parliament

  • Firefighters, bottom, arrive as Greenpeace activists, top left and right, display a banner reading "Protest is a right" as they hug from a crane to protest against the Public Security Law above the Parliament in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Greenpeace activists have hung a banner defending people's right to protest from a construction crane close to Spain's Parliament as part of activities to highlight the coming into effect of the Public Security Law, known as the "gag law," on July 1. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)

    Firefighters, bottom, arrive as Greenpeace activists, top left and right, display a banner reading "Protest is a right" as they hug from a crane to protest against the Public Security Law above the Parliament in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Greenpeace activists have hung a banner defending people's right to protest from a construction crane close to Spain's Parliament as part of activities to highlight the coming into effect of the Public Security Law, known as the "gag law," on July 1. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)  (The Associated Press)

  • Greenpeace activists display a banner reading "Protest is a right" as they hung from a crane to protest against the Public Security Law above the Parliament in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Greenpeace activists have hung a banner defending people's right to protest from a construction crane close to Spain's Parliament as part of activities to highlight the coming into effect of the Public Security Law, known as the "gag law," July 1. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)

    Greenpeace activists display a banner reading "Protest is a right" as they hung from a crane to protest against the Public Security Law above the Parliament in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Greenpeace activists have hung a banner defending people's right to protest from a construction crane close to Spain's Parliament as part of activities to highlight the coming into effect of the Public Security Law, known as the "gag law," July 1. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)  (The Associated Press)

  • Greenpeace activists display a banner reading "Protest is a right" as they hung from a crane to protest against the Public Security Law above the Parliament in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Greenpeace activists have hung a banner defending people's right to protest from a construction crane close to Spain's Parliament as part of activities to highlight the coming into effect of the Public Security Law, known as the "gag law," July 1. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)

    Greenpeace activists display a banner reading "Protest is a right" as they hung from a crane to protest against the Public Security Law above the Parliament in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Greenpeace activists have hung a banner defending people's right to protest from a construction crane close to Spain's Parliament as part of activities to highlight the coming into effect of the Public Security Law, known as the "gag law," July 1. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)  (The Associated Press)

Greenpeace activists have hung a banner defending people's right to protest from a construction crane close to Spain's Parliament as part of activities to highlight the coming into effect of the Public Security Law, known as the "gag law," July 1.

Greenpeace draped the banner, which read "Protesting is a Right" early Tuesday on a crane located just behind the lower house in Madrid.

Social activists plan protests up to and around midnight against the law, which has been criticized by human rights groups, international observers and opposition parties.

The law allows for the summary expulsion of migrants caught illegally entering the country's North African enclaves, sets hefty fines for protests outside Parliament or strategic installations and provides for banning unauthorized television and photographic images of police.