World

China says foreign armed forces invited to take part in military parade, but offers no details

  • Members of a Chinese honor guard take part in a welcome ceremony for Belgium King Philippe in Beijing, Tuesday, June 23, 2015. Chinese organizers of a parade marking the end of World War II were keeping mum Tuesday over the sensitive question of which foreign countries' militaries had been invited to take part. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    Members of a Chinese honor guard take part in a welcome ceremony for Belgium King Philippe in Beijing, Tuesday, June 23, 2015. Chinese organizers of a parade marking the end of World War II were keeping mum Tuesday over the sensitive question of which foreign countries' militaries had been invited to take part. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)  (The Associated Press)

  • Members of a Chinese honor guard prepare for a welcome ceremony for the Belgium King in Beijing, Tuesday, June 23, 2015. Chinese organizers of a parade marking the end of World War II were keeping mum Tuesday over the sensitive question of which foreign countries' militaries had been invited to take part. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    Members of a Chinese honor guard prepare for a welcome ceremony for the Belgium King in Beijing, Tuesday, June 23, 2015. Chinese organizers of a parade marking the end of World War II were keeping mum Tuesday over the sensitive question of which foreign countries' militaries had been invited to take part. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)  (The Associated Press)

  • Members of a Chinese military band take part in a welcome ceremony for the Belgium King in Beijing, Tuesday, June 23, 2015. Chinese organizers of a parade marking the end of World War II were keeping mum Tuesday over the sensitive question of which foreign countries' militaries had been invited to take part. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    Members of a Chinese military band take part in a welcome ceremony for the Belgium King in Beijing, Tuesday, June 23, 2015. Chinese organizers of a parade marking the end of World War II were keeping mum Tuesday over the sensitive question of which foreign countries' militaries had been invited to take part. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)  (The Associated Press)

China is keeping mum on which foreign country's militaries it has invited to join a parade marking the end of World War II.

The Sept. 3 event will include a speech and troop inspection by President Xi Jinping, who also heads China's armed forces. War veterans and their descendants will also receive medals marking the 70th anniversary of victory in what China calls the Chinese People's War of Resistance Against Japanese Aggression.

Parade organizers at a news conference on Tuesday declined to offer details about foreign participation.

Chinese forces under then-President Chiang Kai-shek battled Japanese invaders virtually alone from 1937 until the U.S. entry into the war in 1941. Chiang's forces were later defeated by the communists in the civil war that resumed after the allies' victory in 1945.