World

Japan aims to resume Antarctic whaling this year despite report that it hasn't proven need

FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2014 file photo, booklets titled "The Truth of Whaling Problem" are placed next to whale meat dishes on display at a cafeteria of Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Tokyo as it started to serve whale meat. Japan aims to resume whale hunts in the Antarctic later this year, even though the International Whaling Commission says Tokyo hasn't proven that the mammals need to be killed for research. The IWC's Scientific Committee said in a report Friday, June 19, 2015 that it wasn't able to determine whether lethal sampling is necessary for whale stock management and conservation. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2014 file photo, booklets titled "The Truth of Whaling Problem" are placed next to whale meat dishes on display at a cafeteria of Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Tokyo as it started to serve whale meat. Japan aims to resume whale hunts in the Antarctic later this year, even though the International Whaling Commission says Tokyo hasn't proven that the mammals need to be killed for research. The IWC's Scientific Committee said in a report Friday, June 19, 2015 that it wasn't able to determine whether lethal sampling is necessary for whale stock management and conservation. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)  (The Associated Press)

Japan aims to resume whale hunts in the Antarctic later this year, even though the International Whaling Commission says Tokyo hasn't proven that the mammals need to be killed for research.

The IWC's Scientific Committee said in a report Friday that it wasn't able to determine whether lethal sampling is necessary for whale stock management and conservation.

Japanese officials said they will submit additional data to support their argument. They said Japan's plan to resume whale hunting in the Antarctic this winter season is unchanged.

The IWC banned commercial whaling in 1986, but Japan has continued killing whales under an exemption for research. The International Court of Justice ruled last year the hunts were not truly scientific, forcing Tokyo to submit a revised proposal for the Antarctic whaling.