World

Families of Germanwings crash victims to meet French investigators

  • A convoy of hearses drives on the highway in Duisburg, Germany, Wednesday, June 10, 2015, taking home 16 school children who died in the Germanwings plane crash in March. The coffins, that arrived at the airport in Duesseldorf Tuesday evening, are brought to their families in the city of Haltern. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)

    A convoy of hearses drives on the highway in Duisburg, Germany, Wednesday, June 10, 2015, taking home 16 school children who died in the Germanwings plane crash in March. The coffins, that arrived at the airport in Duesseldorf Tuesday evening, are brought to their families in the city of Haltern. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)  (The Associated Press)

  • Prosecutor Brice Robin, reacts during meeting with media, after the families of Germanwings plane crash victims met with authorities in Paris, Thursday, June 11, 2015. After months of waiting, families of the 150 people killed when a Germanwings plane smashed into the French Alps in March 2015, will finally start burying their loved ones as the airline begins the release of victims and their belongings. (AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)

    Prosecutor Brice Robin, reacts during meeting with media, after the families of Germanwings plane crash victims met with authorities in Paris, Thursday, June 11, 2015. After months of waiting, families of the 150 people killed when a Germanwings plane smashed into the French Alps in March 2015, will finally start burying their loved ones as the airline begins the release of victims and their belongings. (AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)  (The Associated Press)

  • The families of Germanwings plane crash victims arrives at the Foreign Affairs Ministry in Paris Thursday, June 11, 2015, to meet with prosecutor Brice Robin, to discuss the release of their loved one's remains and belongings from the ongoing investigation into the Germanwings aircraft crash. After months of waiting, families of the 150 people killed when a Germanwings plane smashed into the French Alps in March 2015, will finally start burying their loved ones as the airline begins the release of victims and their belongings. (AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)

    The families of Germanwings plane crash victims arrives at the Foreign Affairs Ministry in Paris Thursday, June 11, 2015, to meet with prosecutor Brice Robin, to discuss the release of their loved one's remains and belongings from the ongoing investigation into the Germanwings aircraft crash. After months of waiting, families of the 150 people killed when a Germanwings plane smashed into the French Alps in March 2015, will finally start burying their loved ones as the airline begins the release of victims and their belongings. (AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)  (The Associated Press)

Families of victims of the Germanwings plane crash are gathering in Paris to meet with investigators, amid lingering questions about why the co-pilot destroyed the plane and how families may be compensated for their loss.

The meeting Thursday comes in the same week that the first remains were returned to families after the March 24 crash, which killed all 150 people aboard.

Marseille Prosecutor Brice Robin and other French officials are seeing families in Paris then giving a news conference.

Robin says co-pilot Andreas Lubitz intentionally flew Flight 9525 into the French Alps en route from Barcelona to Duesseldorf. German authorities have said he suffered depression in the past and had researched suicide methods.

The first burial is expected Friday. Most of the victims were German or Spanish.