World

South African president apologizes to Mozambique for recent attacks on foreigners

  • A South African soldier walks past a woman holding her baby standing at the entrance of her flat in Manenberg, South Africa Thursday, May 21, 2015. Hundreds of South African police and army members took part in an early morning raid on Manenberg after recent gang violence, looking for drugs and illegal firearms. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)

    A South African soldier walks past a woman holding her baby standing at the entrance of her flat in Manenberg, South Africa Thursday, May 21, 2015. Hundreds of South African police and army members took part in an early morning raid on Manenberg after recent gang violence, looking for drugs and illegal firearms. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)  (The Associated Press)

  • A South African soldier, right,  provide security for  policemen, left,  as they look for drugs in  Manenberg, South Africa,  Thursday, May 21, 2015. Hundreds of South African Police and Army members took part in an early morning raid on Manenberg after recent gang violence, looking fro drugs and illegal firearms.  (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)

    A South African soldier, right, provide security for policemen, left, as they look for drugs in Manenberg, South Africa, Thursday, May 21, 2015. Hundreds of South African Police and Army members took part in an early morning raid on Manenberg after recent gang violence, looking fro drugs and illegal firearms. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)  (The Associated Press)

  • A South African policeman, right, speaks to woman as he and others search for drugs  in Manenberg, South Africa,  Thursday, May 21, 2015. Hundreds of South African Police and Army members took part in an early morning raid on Manenberg after recent gang violence, looking fro drugs and illegal firearms.  (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)

    A South African policeman, right, speaks to woman as he and others search for drugs in Manenberg, South Africa, Thursday, May 21, 2015. Hundreds of South African Police and Army members took part in an early morning raid on Manenberg after recent gang violence, looking fro drugs and illegal firearms. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)  (The Associated Press)

South Africa's president has apologized to the neighboring country of Mozambique for a spate of attacks on foreigners in his country.

Last month, a Mozambican immigrant was one of seven people killed in violence targeting immigrants living in South Africa.

President Jacob Zuma said he was apologizing on behalf of a minority of South Africans who committed the "atrocious acts." He said the South African government was working hard to ensure that similar attacks would not take place.

Zuma was speaking at a banquet held by Mozambican President Filipe Nyusi on Wednesday, as part of a two-day state visit.

More than 2,000 Mozambicans returned home following the violence, according to Mozambican authorities. More than 400 Mozambicans living in South Africa were also deported after they were arrested in police raids.