World

Congo brings experts in to assess $6.7 billion projects in mines, roads with Chinese

  • In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers travel on the back of a trailer pulled by a tractor on their way to work in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)

    In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers travel on the back of a trailer pulled by a tractor on their way to work in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers at the building site of a new hotel to be used by Congo government officials when completed in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)

    In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers at the building site of a new hotel to be used by Congo government officials when completed in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers inside a new hotel being built for the use by  Congo government officials when completed in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.  Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)

    In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers inside a new hotel being built for the use by Congo government officials when completed in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)  (The Associated Press)

Congo's government is bringing in outside experts to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics say could exploit the central African nation's mineral riches.

Congo's government has a 32 percent stake while China has 68 percent in the mining project called Sicomines. The Chinese companies are building roads, railways, hospitals and other infrastructure for a stake in mining.

Deputy general manager of Sicomines, Jean Nzenga Kongolo said the project now employs about 3,000 people, of whom 70 percent are Congolese.

World Bank representative Ahmadou Moustapha Ndiaye said the project is aligned with the right objectives. He and a U.N. official visited the site Saturday.

Civil society leader Jonas Tshiombela says a more thorough evaluation of the contract still must be done.