World

Amnesty International sounds alarm over torture practiced by Moroccan authorities

  • Abderrazak Jkaou describes to reporters how he was tortured and beaten by police for demonstrating, in Rabat, Morocco, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. Human rights group Amnesty International has issued a report documenting widespread torture by the Moroccan state, contrary to its public commitment to reform. The report recommended that lawyers be present during interrogations, allegations of torture be investigated and those reporting abuses be protected -- all measures present in the penal code but rarely implemented. (AP Photo/Paul Schemm)

    Abderrazak Jkaou describes to reporters how he was tortured and beaten by police for demonstrating, in Rabat, Morocco, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. Human rights group Amnesty International has issued a report documenting widespread torture by the Moroccan state, contrary to its public commitment to reform. The report recommended that lawyers be present during interrogations, allegations of torture be investigated and those reporting abuses be protected -- all measures present in the penal code but rarely implemented. (AP Photo/Paul Schemm)  (The Associated Press)

  • Amnesty International director Mohammed Sektaoui, left, addresses reporters at a press conference next to Amnesty researcher Sirine Rached, in Rabat, Morocco, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. Human rights group Amnesty International has issued a report documenting widespread torture by the Moroccan state, contrary to its public commitment to reform. The report recommended that lawyers be present during interrogations, allegations of torture be investigated and those reporting abuses be protected -- all measures present in the penal code but rarely implemented. (AP Photo/Paul Schemm)

    Amnesty International director Mohammed Sektaoui, left, addresses reporters at a press conference next to Amnesty researcher Sirine Rached, in Rabat, Morocco, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. Human rights group Amnesty International has issued a report documenting widespread torture by the Moroccan state, contrary to its public commitment to reform. The report recommended that lawyers be present during interrogations, allegations of torture be investigated and those reporting abuses be protected -- all measures present in the penal code but rarely implemented. (AP Photo/Paul Schemm)  (The Associated Press)

  • Abderrazak Jkaou describes to reporters how he was tortured and beaten by police for demonstrating, in Rabat, Morocco, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. Human rights group Amnesty International has issued a report documenting widespread torture by the Moroccan state, contrary to its public commitment to reform. The report recommended that lawyers be present during interrogations, allegations of torture be investigated and those reporting abuses be protected -- all measures present in the penal code but rarely implemented. (AP Photo/Paul Schemm)

    Abderrazak Jkaou describes to reporters how he was tortured and beaten by police for demonstrating, in Rabat, Morocco, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. Human rights group Amnesty International has issued a report documenting widespread torture by the Moroccan state, contrary to its public commitment to reform. The report recommended that lawyers be present during interrogations, allegations of torture be investigated and those reporting abuses be protected -- all measures present in the penal code but rarely implemented. (AP Photo/Paul Schemm)  (The Associated Press)

Human rights group Amnesty International has issued a report documenting widespread torture by the Moroccan state, contrary to its public commitment to reform.

Examples included abusing protesters, raping detainees with objects and beating confessions out of suspects.

The report, released Tuesday by the London-based group, also noted that those accusing the police of torture are now being prosecuted for slander and defamation, in a bid to discourage them from speaking out.

The report acknowledges that there have been improvements over the past 20 years but said there is often a large gap between public commitments to end torture and actual practices.

The Moroccan government response, which was included in the report, rejected the findings, calling into question the credibility of Amnesty's sources.