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Argentina's top court backs 97-year-old justice after government says he's unfit to serve

  • A supporter of Supreme Court judge Carlos Fayt holds his picture that reads in Spanish "Courage" during a rally in his favor in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, May 13, 2015. The government is questioning whether the 97-year-old judge is in good enough physical and mental condition to stay on the court, after he didn't attend a court meeting that re-elected the head of the court. His fellow court members gave him their support Wednesday, saying he cast his vote and that those decisions can be signed inside or outside the court. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

    A supporter of Supreme Court judge Carlos Fayt holds his picture that reads in Spanish "Courage" during a rally in his favor in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, May 13, 2015. The government is questioning whether the 97-year-old judge is in good enough physical and mental condition to stay on the court, after he didn't attend a court meeting that re-elected the head of the court. His fellow court members gave him their support Wednesday, saying he cast his vote and that those decisions can be signed inside or outside the court. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)  (The Associated Press)

  • A woman holds a sign that reads in Spanish "Advanced age doesn't annul intelligence" at a demonstration in defense of Supreme Court judge Carlos Fayt in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, May 13, 2015. The government is questioning whether the 97-year-old judge is in good enough physical and mental condition to stay on the court, after it he didn't attend a court meeting that re-elected the head of the court. His fellow court members gave him their support Wednesday, saying he cast his vote and that those decisions can be signed inside or outside the court. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

    A woman holds a sign that reads in Spanish "Advanced age doesn't annul intelligence" at a demonstration in defense of Supreme Court judge Carlos Fayt in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, May 13, 2015. The government is questioning whether the 97-year-old judge is in good enough physical and mental condition to stay on the court, after it he didn't attend a court meeting that re-elected the head of the court. His fellow court members gave him their support Wednesday, saying he cast his vote and that those decisions can be signed inside or outside the court. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)  (The Associated Press)

  • Supreme Court Judge Carlos Fayt arrives home in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, May 13, 2015. The government is questioning whether the 97-year-old judge is in good enough physical and mental condition to stay on the court, after he didn't attend a court meeting that re-elected the head of the court. His fellow court members gave him their support Wednesday, saying he cast his vote and that those decisions can be signed inside or outside the court. (Anibal Greco, La Nacion via AP) ARGENTINA OUT- NO USAR EN ARGENTINA

    Supreme Court Judge Carlos Fayt arrives home in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, May 13, 2015. The government is questioning whether the 97-year-old judge is in good enough physical and mental condition to stay on the court, after he didn't attend a court meeting that re-elected the head of the court. His fellow court members gave him their support Wednesday, saying he cast his vote and that those decisions can be signed inside or outside the court. (Anibal Greco, La Nacion via AP) ARGENTINA OUT- NO USAR EN ARGENTINA  (The Associated Press)

Argentina's Supreme Court judges are backing a 97-year-old fellow justice amid government claims he is physically and mentally incapable of remaining in his post.

Carlos Fayt is the oldest member of the court. The government has been questioning his absence at recent hearings, including one in April to confirm the panel's president, Ricardo Lorenzetti.

Fayt later signed the decision selecting Lorenzetti, and the judges said Wednesday the signature was enough for that kind of action.

President Cristina Fernandez's government recently called for a congressional investigation of Fayt's ability to serve at his advanced age.

Opposition members accuse the Fernandez administration of trying to replace Fayt with a judge more sympathetic to the government during an investigation of the president's finances and the trial of several officials on corruption charges.