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Mexican teen shows up saying she is the right 'Alondra' wanted in Houston

Alondra Luna Nunez smiles after attending a press conference upon her arrival to the Guanajuato International Airport in Silao, Mexico, Wednesday, April 22, 2015.

Alondra Luna Nunez smiles after attending a press conference upon her arrival to the Guanajuato International Airport in Silao, Mexico, Wednesday, April 22, 2015.  (AP)

A girl claiming to be a Houston woman's daughter illegally taken to Mexico eight years ago has turned herself in to a court that mistakenly sent another girl to the United States against her will last month, an official said Monday.

The court official in the southwestern state of Michoacan said a girl who identified herself as Alondra Diaz showed up at the court building accompanied by three relatives.

The official, who was not authorized to be quoted by name and spoke on condition of anonymity, said the court was evaluating the girl's paperwork and identity documents.

The whereabouts of Alondra Diaz have been unknown since 2007, when her father allegedly took her to Mexico without her mother's consent.

In April, a judge erroneously sent another girl named Alondra to be reunited with Houston resident Dorotea Garcia, who was convinced she was her long-lost daughter.

The case attracted international attention after video circulated on social media showing Alondra Luna Nunez being taken kicking and screaming from court by police.

Days later, DNA testing in the United States proved that Alondra Luna was not Garcia's daughter, and she was returned to her family in Guanajuato, Mexico. The girl and her family had asked for a DNA examination before she was sent to Texas, but the judge said that was not within her authority and declined to order the test.

Prosecutors are investigating the case.

Susana Nunez, the mother of Alondra Luna, sounded a note of caution after what she called her family's nightmare.

"I hope the authorities simply make sure that this girl is truly her, that they have the right girl," Nunez told The Associated Press by phone.

If it turns out to be the right Alondra, she said, "I'm happy for her and her mother."

Nunez said her daughter was doing well following her ordeal, returning to school and resuming the usual life of a teenager.

"She has calmed down," Nunez said.

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