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With a week to go, Britain's political leaders make last big televised bid to woo voters

  • Britain's Prime Minister, and leader of the Conservative Party, David Cameron, addresses locals during a 'walkabout' whilst campaigning in Wetherby, northern England, Thursday April 30, 2015. Britain goes to the polls in a General Election on May 7. (Toby Melville/Pool Photo via AP)

    Britain's Prime Minister, and leader of the Conservative Party, David Cameron, addresses locals during a 'walkabout' whilst campaigning in Wetherby, northern England, Thursday April 30, 2015. Britain goes to the polls in a General Election on May 7. (Toby Melville/Pool Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • The Scottish Sun in a shop in Edinburgh, as the newspaper comes out in favour of the Scottish National Party, Thursday April 30, 2015. Rupert Murdoch's tabloid Sun has spoken, urging voters to back David Cameron's Conservative Party in Britain's election — unless they're in Scotland. There, it says, they should vote for the Scottish National Party. The differing endorsements raised a few eyebrows Thursday, since the London-based Sun dubbed the pro-Scottish independence nationalists "saboteurs" determined to wreck Britain. ( Danny Lawson/PA via AP)  UNITED KINGDOM OUT  NO SALES  NO ARCHIVE

    The Scottish Sun in a shop in Edinburgh, as the newspaper comes out in favour of the Scottish National Party, Thursday April 30, 2015. Rupert Murdoch's tabloid Sun has spoken, urging voters to back David Cameron's Conservative Party in Britain's election — unless they're in Scotland. There, it says, they should vote for the Scottish National Party. The differing endorsements raised a few eyebrows Thursday, since the London-based Sun dubbed the pro-Scottish independence nationalists "saboteurs" determined to wreck Britain. ( Danny Lawson/PA via AP) UNITED KINGDOM OUT NO SALES NO ARCHIVE  (The Associated Press)

  • Scotland's First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, delivers a keynote speech during a press conference in Glasgow, Scotland, as the Scottish National Party leader insisted Wednesday April 29, 2015, that the General Election is "not about independence" for the party. Britain goes to the polls in a General Election on May 7. (Danny Lawson/PA via AP) UNITED KINGDOM OUT  NO SALES  NO ARCHIVE

    Scotland's First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, delivers a keynote speech during a press conference in Glasgow, Scotland, as the Scottish National Party leader insisted Wednesday April 29, 2015, that the General Election is "not about independence" for the party. Britain goes to the polls in a General Election on May 7. (Danny Lawson/PA via AP) UNITED KINGDOM OUT NO SALES NO ARCHIVE  (The Associated Press)

With a week to go until election day, the leaders of Britain's three main political parties are making their last big televised bid to win over undecided voters.

Conservative leader David Cameron, Labour's Ed Miliband and Liberal Democrat chief Nick Clegg are fielding questions from voters at Leeds Town Hall in northern England — though they won't debate one another.

Cameron, the prime minister, went first Thursday, defending his government's cuts to welfare benefits and arguing that his "difficult decisions" had curbed the deficit and restored Britain's economy.

Debates have been a cause of election friction. Cameron's opponents branded him "chicken" after he agreed to participate in only one, a seven-way faceoff on April 2. Opposition leaders later held another debate without him.

Britons go to the polls May 7.