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European court rules Italy responsible for 'torture' in beating of man during G-8 protest

  • In this July 22, 2001 file photo, Italian riot police arrest unidentified anti-G8 protestors following a violent police raid in the A. Diaz school where they were housed during the Group of Eight (G8) meeting, in Genoa, northern Italy.  Europe's top human rights court said Tuesday, April 7, 2015, the unpunished police beating of 62-year-old Arnaldo Cestaro during July 2001 protests at the Genoa G-8 summit amounted to torture. The night of July 21-22, 2001, both Cestaro and a group of protesters were in a school when police stormed the building. The court said Cestaro raised his arms in surrender, but was beaten and kicked by the officers, suffering fractures and other injuries. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, files)

    In this July 22, 2001 file photo, Italian riot police arrest unidentified anti-G8 protestors following a violent police raid in the A. Diaz school where they were housed during the Group of Eight (G8) meeting, in Genoa, northern Italy. Europe's top human rights court said Tuesday, April 7, 2015, the unpunished police beating of 62-year-old Arnaldo Cestaro during July 2001 protests at the Genoa G-8 summit amounted to torture. The night of July 21-22, 2001, both Cestaro and a group of protesters were in a school when police stormed the building. The court said Cestaro raised his arms in surrender, but was beaten and kicked by the officers, suffering fractures and other injuries. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, files)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this July 21, 2001file photo, pools of blood on the floor of the Diaz school in Genoa, Italy, used as headquarters by antigloblal activists, are seen after police searched through the building during the G8 summit.  Europe's top human rights court said Tuesday, April 7, 2015, the unpunished police beating of 62-year-old Arnaldo Cestaro during July 2001 protests at the Genoa G-8 summit amounted to torture. The night of July 21-22, 2001, both Cestaro and a group of protesters were in a school when police stormed the building. The court said Cestaro raised his arms in surrender, but was beaten and kicked by the officers, suffering fractures and other injuries. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno/file)

    In this July 21, 2001file photo, pools of blood on the floor of the Diaz school in Genoa, Italy, used as headquarters by antigloblal activists, are seen after police searched through the building during the G8 summit. Europe's top human rights court said Tuesday, April 7, 2015, the unpunished police beating of 62-year-old Arnaldo Cestaro during July 2001 protests at the Genoa G-8 summit amounted to torture. The night of July 21-22, 2001, both Cestaro and a group of protesters were in a school when police stormed the building. The court said Cestaro raised his arms in surrender, but was beaten and kicked by the officers, suffering fractures and other injuries. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno/file)  (The Associated Press)

  • Sunday, July 22 2001file photoof a member of the Anti-globalization Genoa Social Forum, taken on a stretcher to an ambulance after a police raid inside the activists center in Genoa, Italy. Europe's top human rights court said Tuesday, April 7, 2015, the unpunished police beating of 62-year-old Arnaldo Cestaro during July 2001 protests at the Genoa G-8 summit amounted to torture. The night of July 21-22, 2001, both Cestaro and a group of protesters were in a school when police stormed the building. The court said Cestaro raised his arms in surrender, but was beaten and kicked by the officers, suffering fractures and other injuries.  (AP Photo/Marco di Lauro)

    Sunday, July 22 2001file photoof a member of the Anti-globalization Genoa Social Forum, taken on a stretcher to an ambulance after a police raid inside the activists center in Genoa, Italy. Europe's top human rights court said Tuesday, April 7, 2015, the unpunished police beating of 62-year-old Arnaldo Cestaro during July 2001 protests at the Genoa G-8 summit amounted to torture. The night of July 21-22, 2001, both Cestaro and a group of protesters were in a school when police stormed the building. The court said Cestaro raised his arms in surrender, but was beaten and kicked by the officers, suffering fractures and other injuries. (AP Photo/Marco di Lauro)  (The Associated Press)

Europe's top human rights court says the unpunished police beating of a 62-year-old man during July 2001 protests at the Genoa G-8 summit amounted to torture.

The summit was marked by violent confrontations between black-clad protesters and police, with entire neighborhoods devastated. The night of July 21-22, both Arnaldo Cestaro and a group of protesters were in a school when police stormed the building. The court said Cestaro raised his arms in surrender, but was beaten and kicked by the officers, suffering fractures and other injuries.

The Strasbourg-based European Court of Human Rights ruled Tuesday that Cestaro's treatment amounted to torture, and criticized the lack of accountability for those responsible for the violence. Cestaro was awarded 45,000 euros ($48,900) and the court said Italy must change its laws.