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Safety Board says plane landed so short of Halifax runway it knocked out power to the airport

  • An investigator inspects an Air Canada flight plane that landed hard and skidded off the runway in the midst of a snowstorm at Stanfield International Airport in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Sunday, March 29, 2015. Chief operating officer Klaus Goersch said 25 people were taken to hospital and all but one of them were released. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Andrew Vaughan)

    An investigator inspects an Air Canada flight plane that landed hard and skidded off the runway in the midst of a snowstorm at Stanfield International Airport in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Sunday, March 29, 2015. Chief operating officer Klaus Goersch said 25 people were taken to hospital and all but one of them were released. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Andrew Vaughan)  (The Associated Press)

  • Mike Cunningham, a senior investigator with the Transportation Safety Board, takes questions on Air Canada flight AC624 that crashed early Sunday morning during a snowstorm, at Stanfield International Airport in Halifax on Sunday, March 29, 2015. Air Canada says 25 people were taken to hospital. The flight had 133 passengers and five crew members. (The Canadian Press, Andrew Vaughan)

    Mike Cunningham, a senior investigator with the Transportation Safety Board, takes questions on Air Canada flight AC624 that crashed early Sunday morning during a snowstorm, at Stanfield International Airport in Halifax on Sunday, March 29, 2015. Air Canada says 25 people were taken to hospital. The flight had 133 passengers and five crew members. (The Canadian Press, Andrew Vaughan)  (The Associated Press)

  • An investigator inspects an Air Canada flight plane that landed hard and skidded off the runway in the midst of a snowstorm at Stanfield International Airport in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Sunday, March 29, 2015. Chief operating officer Klaus Goersch said 25 people were taken to hospital and all but one of them were released. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Andrew Vaughan)

    An investigator inspects an Air Canada flight plane that landed hard and skidded off the runway in the midst of a snowstorm at Stanfield International Airport in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Sunday, March 29, 2015. Chief operating officer Klaus Goersch said 25 people were taken to hospital and all but one of them were released. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Andrew Vaughan)  (The Associated Press)

A Transportation Safety Board investigator says an Air Canada plane landed so significantly short of the runway in Halifax that it hit a power line and knocked out power at the airport.

The Airbus 320 landed 1,100 feet short of the runway during a Sunday morning snowstorm. It crashed into a bank of antennas and sheared off its main landing gear, nose cone and an engine before skidding on its belly. Twenty-five people were taken to the hospital and all but one has been released.

Mike Cunningham, the lead investigator, said in an interview Monday that they're still trying to determine why Flight AC624 landed prematurely.