World

President urges Nigerians to vote peacefully in critical election; dozens already killed

  • Nigerians bow in the main mosque during Friday prayers, in the capital Abuja, Nigeria, Friday, March 27, 2015. Nigerians are due to go to the polls to vote in presidential elections on Saturday. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

    Nigerians bow in the main mosque during Friday prayers, in the capital Abuja, Nigeria, Friday, March 27, 2015. Nigerians are due to go to the polls to vote in presidential elections on Saturday. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)  (The Associated Press)

  • Nigerian women go through a security check as they enter the main mosque for Friday prayers in the capital Abuja, Nigeria Friday, March 27, 2015. Nigerians are due to go to the polls to vote in presidential elections on Saturday. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

    Nigerian women go through a security check as they enter the main mosque for Friday prayers in the capital Abuja, Nigeria Friday, March 27, 2015. Nigerians are due to go to the polls to vote in presidential elections on Saturday. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)  (The Associated Press)

  • Nigerian women go through a security check as they enter the main mosque for Friday prayers in the capital Abuja, Nigeria Friday, March 27, 2015. Nigerians are due to go to the polls to vote in presidential elections on Saturday. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

    Nigerian women go through a security check as they enter the main mosque for Friday prayers in the capital Abuja, Nigeria Friday, March 27, 2015. Nigerians are due to go to the polls to vote in presidential elections on Saturday. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)  (The Associated Press)

Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan is urging his nation to vote peacefully and accept results of Saturday's presidential election, which analysts say will be the tightest in the nation's history.

Jonathan said in a televised broadcast Friday that no political ambition can justify shedding blood. Dozens of people already have been killed.

Jonathan and leading rival Muhammadu Buhari signed peace pledges Thursday and urged their supporters to avoid violence.

Human rights leaders says politicians have done little to lower tensions heightened by hate speech on ethnic and religious lines.

Security forces are also on high alert against attacks by Boko Haram Islamic extremists who have threatened to disrupt the vote.