World

After plane crash in French Alps, Denmark wants 2 people in the cockpit when in the air

  • FILE - In this Feb. 22, 2010 file picture, a Lufthansa Airlines pilot holds the brim of his cap at the airport in Frankfurt, Germany. Carsten Spohr, CEO Lufthansa _ the parent company of Germanwings _ says his pilots undergo yearly medical examination but that doesn't include psychological tests. (AP Photo/dpa, Boris Roessler, File)

    FILE - In this Feb. 22, 2010 file picture, a Lufthansa Airlines pilot holds the brim of his cap at the airport in Frankfurt, Germany. Carsten Spohr, CEO Lufthansa _ the parent company of Germanwings _ says his pilots undergo yearly medical examination but that doesn't include psychological tests. (AP Photo/dpa, Boris Roessler, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this undated photo provided by the French Interior Ministry, French emergency rescue services work at the site of the Germanwings jet that crashed on Tuesday, March 24, 2015 near Seyne-les-Alpes, France. The co-pilot of the Germanwings jet barricaded himself in the cockpit and intentionally rammed the plane full speed into the French Alps, ignoring the captain's frantic pounding on the door and the screams of terror from passengers, a prosecutor said Thursday. (AP Photo/French Interior Ministry, Francis Pellier)

    In this undated photo provided by the French Interior Ministry, French emergency rescue services work at the site of the Germanwings jet that crashed on Tuesday, March 24, 2015 near Seyne-les-Alpes, France. The co-pilot of the Germanwings jet barricaded himself in the cockpit and intentionally rammed the plane full speed into the French Alps, ignoring the captain's frantic pounding on the door and the screams of terror from passengers, a prosecutor said Thursday. (AP Photo/French Interior Ministry, Francis Pellier)  (The Associated Press)

Denmark's transport minister says a recommendation will be sent Friday to all airlines with a base in the Scandinavian country to have two people in the cockpit when in the air.

Airlines and officials around the world are starting to impose the rule after details emerged that the co-pilot of Germanwings Flight 9525 had apparently locked himself in the cockpit and deliberated crashed the plane into the mountains below.

Transport Minister Magnus Heunicke said in a live television interview with the TV2 channel that the Danish Transport Authority also would review all physical and mental tests of pilots flying to and from Denmark. German news media have depicted co-pilot Andreas Lubitz as a man with a history of depression who had received psychological treatment.