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After probe slams UCI on doping and Armstrong, new cycling chief says problems remain

  • FILE - In this April 3, 2008 file photo, Hein Verbruggen, coordination commission chairman of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Organizing Committee, listens during a news conference in Beijing. Cycling leaders let doping flourish and broke their own rules so Lance Armstrong could cheat his way to become a superstar the sport badly needed, according to a scathing report into its drug culture published Monday, March 9, 2015. The International Cycling Union was severely criticized for failing to act during the doping era dominated by Armstrong, but the 227-page report found no evidence that he paid to cover up alleged positive tests. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)

    FILE - In this April 3, 2008 file photo, Hein Verbruggen, coordination commission chairman of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Organizing Committee, listens during a news conference in Beijing. Cycling leaders let doping flourish and broke their own rules so Lance Armstrong could cheat his way to become a superstar the sport badly needed, according to a scathing report into its drug culture published Monday, March 9, 2015. The International Cycling Union was severely criticized for failing to act during the doping era dominated by Armstrong, but the 227-page report found no evidence that he paid to cover up alleged positive tests. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - A Friday, Oct. 12, 2012 photo from files showing the then President of the International Cycling Union, Pat McQuaid, speaking during an interview after the fourth stage of the Tour of Beijing in Beijing. Cycling leaders let doping flourish and broke their own rules so Lance Armstrong could cheat his way to become a superstar the sport badly needed, according to a scathing report into its drug culture published Monday, March 9, 2015. The International Cycling Union was severely criticized for failing to act during the doping era dominated by Armstrong, but the 227-page report found no evidence that he paid to cover up alleged positive tests. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)

    FILE - A Friday, Oct. 12, 2012 photo from files showing the then President of the International Cycling Union, Pat McQuaid, speaking during an interview after the fourth stage of the Tour of Beijing in Beijing. Cycling leaders let doping flourish and broke their own rules so Lance Armstrong could cheat his way to become a superstar the sport badly needed, according to a scathing report into its drug culture published Monday, March 9, 2015. The International Cycling Union was severely criticized for failing to act during the doping era dominated by Armstrong, but the 227-page report found no evidence that he paid to cover up alleged positive tests. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)  (The Associated Press)

UCI President Brian Cookson says cycling still has "an endemic problem of lower-level doping."

Cookson also says he will ask former UCI leader Hein Verbruggen to give up his honorary presidency after a scathing report into the sport's doping culture revealed the governing body colluded with and protected Lance Armstrong.

The 227-page report, published Monday after a year-long probe, criticized Verbruggen and successor Pat McQuaid for letting doping flourish and breaking rules and covering up for the sport's star rider.

Cookson says Armstrong's first Tour de France win in 1999 was "an absolutely critical moment" in sending a message the UCI was not serious about stopping doping.

The UCI chief acknowledges "we have not solved the problem" but questions the claim of one witness in the report who suggested 90 percent of top-level riders still dope.