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Lance Armstrong welcomes investigation into doping and cycling's murky past leadership

  • FILE - This file photo taken July 25, 2010, shows Lance Armstrong looking back on the podium after the 20th and last stage of the Tour de France cycling race in Paris, France. Cycling leaders let doping flourish and broke their own rules so Lance Armstrong could cheat his way to become a superstar the sport badly needed, according to a scathing report into its drug culture published Monday, March 9, 2015. The International Cycling Union was severely criticized for failing to act during the doping era dominated by Armstrong, but the 227-page report found no evidence that he paid to cover up alleged positive tests. (AP Photo/Bas Czerwinski, File)

    FILE - This file photo taken July 25, 2010, shows Lance Armstrong looking back on the podium after the 20th and last stage of the Tour de France cycling race in Paris, France. Cycling leaders let doping flourish and broke their own rules so Lance Armstrong could cheat his way to become a superstar the sport badly needed, according to a scathing report into its drug culture published Monday, March 9, 2015. The International Cycling Union was severely criticized for failing to act during the doping era dominated by Armstrong, but the 227-page report found no evidence that he paid to cover up alleged positive tests. (AP Photo/Bas Czerwinski, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - A Sunday, July 25, 2010 photo from files showing a fan with an American flag running alongside Lance Armstrong of the US during the parade after the 20th and last stage of the Tour de France cycling race in Paris, France. Cycling leaders let doping flourish and broke their own rules so Lance Armstrong could cheat his way to become a superstar the sport badly needed, according to a scathing report into its drug culture published Monday, March 9, 2015. The International Cycling Union was severely criticized for failing to act during the doping era dominated by Armstrong, but the 227-page report found no evidence that he paid to cover up alleged positive tests. (AP Photo/Eric Gaillard, File Pool)

    FILE - A Sunday, July 25, 2010 photo from files showing a fan with an American flag running alongside Lance Armstrong of the US during the parade after the 20th and last stage of the Tour de France cycling race in Paris, France. Cycling leaders let doping flourish and broke their own rules so Lance Armstrong could cheat his way to become a superstar the sport badly needed, according to a scathing report into its drug culture published Monday, March 9, 2015. The International Cycling Union was severely criticized for failing to act during the doping era dominated by Armstrong, but the 227-page report found no evidence that he paid to cover up alleged positive tests. (AP Photo/Eric Gaillard, File Pool)  (The Associated Press)

Lance Armstrong has welcomed an investigative report into the murky past of cycling's governing body and said he hopes it can help the sport move on from an era that will always be remembered for the doping by himself and others.

The report turned up no evidence to sustain previous allegations that Armstrong paid the UCI to cover up a positive doping test back in his heyday, yet it explains in great detail how the UCI acted favorably toward Armstrong — a rider dubbed "cycling's pop star."

Armstrong said in a statement that "it is my hope that revealing the truth will lead to a bright, dope-free future for the sport I love."