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UK scientists work out weight of Sophie, 1 of world's most complete Stegosaurus skeletons

This undated handout photo issued by the Natural History Museum, shows an artist's impression of how Sophie, the world's most complete Stegosaurus skeleton, may have looked. Scientists at a British museum have worked out the weight of Sophie, one of the world’s most complete Stegosaurus skeletons, it was reported on Wednesday, March 4, 2015. London’s Natural History Museum says Sophie, a young adult when it died, weighed around 1.6 tons and was about the same size as a small rhinoceros. The scientists worked out the dinosaur's body mass after creating a 3D digital version of its skeleton, calculating the volume of flesh around the bones, and comparing the data with information from similar-sized modern animals. (AP Photo/PA, Bob Nicholls/Natural History Museum)

This undated handout photo issued by the Natural History Museum, shows an artist's impression of how Sophie, the world's most complete Stegosaurus skeleton, may have looked. Scientists at a British museum have worked out the weight of Sophie, one of the world’s most complete Stegosaurus skeletons, it was reported on Wednesday, March 4, 2015. London’s Natural History Museum says Sophie, a young adult when it died, weighed around 1.6 tons and was about the same size as a small rhinoceros. The scientists worked out the dinosaur's body mass after creating a 3D digital version of its skeleton, calculating the volume of flesh around the bones, and comparing the data with information from similar-sized modern animals. (AP Photo/PA, Bob Nicholls/Natural History Museum)  (The Associated Press)

Scientists at a British museum have worked out the weight of Sophie, one of the world's most complete Stegosaurus skeletons.

London's Natural History Museum says Sophie, a young adult when it died, weighed around 1.6 tons and was about the same size as a small rhinoceros.

The scientists worked out the dinosaur's body mass after creating a 3-D digital version of its skeleton, calculating the volume of flesh around the bones, and comparing the data with information from similar-sized modern animals.

The skeleton, which is 85 percent intact, greets visitors entering the museum. It was discovered in 2003 at Red Canyon Ranch in Wyoming.