World

US fears Palestinian Authority could collapse without cash injection, looking for solution

Britain's Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, deliver a statement at a press conference in London, Saturday Feb, 21, 2015.  US Secretary of State John Kerry, in London for talks with Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, said Russia's conduct was "simply unacceptable" and that he expected to see agreement on further international sanctions in the coming days. "Russia has engaged in an absolutely brazen and cynical process over these last days. We know to a certainty what Russia has been providing to the separatists, how Russia is involved with the separatists," he told reporters. (AP Phto/Neil Hall/Pool)

Britain's Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, deliver a statement at a press conference in London, Saturday Feb, 21, 2015. US Secretary of State John Kerry, in London for talks with Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, said Russia's conduct was "simply unacceptable" and that he expected to see agreement on further international sanctions in the coming days. "Russia has engaged in an absolutely brazen and cynical process over these last days. We know to a certainty what Russia has been providing to the separatists, how Russia is involved with the separatists," he told reporters. (AP Phto/Neil Hall/Pool)  (The Associated Press)

The U.S. fears that without a cash injection, the Palestinian Authority could collapse, entailing serious security implications for Palestinians and Israelis.

Secretary of State John Kerry discussed the issue Saturday with British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond in London.

Kerry said the possibility of the Palestinian government halting security cooperation with Israel or disbanding because of its economic predicament was real.

The U.S. is trying to find a solution.

Israel has withheld tax revenue from the Palestinians since they decided to join the International Criminal Court last month.

U.S. options are limited. Its relationship with Israel is strained amid their leaders' dispute over Iran. And it has little leverage with Arab and European governments at a time it can offer little additional financial support itself because of opposition in Congress.