World

France says it's tracking hundreds believed to be in possible terror group sleeper cells

  • In this photo taken on Monday Feb. 16, 2015, French interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve gestures during an interview with the Associated Press, at his office in Paris. France’s top security official says the country is tracking hundreds of people believed to be sleeper cells for terror organizations. Cazeneuve laid out the increasingly urgent question for intelligence services: How to trace the moment when someone transforms from disgruntled criminal into terrorist, and how to block initial radicalization. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

    In this photo taken on Monday Feb. 16, 2015, French interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve gestures during an interview with the Associated Press, at his office in Paris. France’s top security official says the country is tracking hundreds of people believed to be sleeper cells for terror organizations. Cazeneuve laid out the increasingly urgent question for intelligence services: How to trace the moment when someone transforms from disgruntled criminal into terrorist, and how to block initial radicalization. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this photo taken on Monday Feb. 16, 2015, French interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve gestures during an interview with the Associated Press, at his office in Paris. France’s top security official says the country is tracking hundreds of people believed to be sleeper cells for terror organizations. Cazeneuve laid out the increasingly urgent question for intelligence services: How to trace the moment when someone transforms from disgruntled criminal into terrorist, and how to block initial radicalization. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

    In this photo taken on Monday Feb. 16, 2015, French interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve gestures during an interview with the Associated Press, at his office in Paris. France’s top security official says the country is tracking hundreds of people believed to be sleeper cells for terror organizations. Cazeneuve laid out the increasingly urgent question for intelligence services: How to trace the moment when someone transforms from disgruntled criminal into terrorist, and how to block initial radicalization. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this photo taken on Monday Feb. 16, 2015, French interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve gestures during an interview with the Associated Press, at his office in Paris. France’s top security official says the country is tracking hundreds of people believed to be sleeper cells for terror organizations. Cazeneuve laid out the increasingly urgent question for intelligence services: How to trace the moment when someone transforms from disgruntled criminal into terrorist, and how to block initial radicalization. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

    In this photo taken on Monday Feb. 16, 2015, French interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve gestures during an interview with the Associated Press, at his office in Paris. France’s top security official says the country is tracking hundreds of people believed to be sleeper cells for terror organizations. Cazeneuve laid out the increasingly urgent question for intelligence services: How to trace the moment when someone transforms from disgruntled criminal into terrorist, and how to block initial radicalization. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)  (The Associated Press)

France's top security official says the country is tracking hundreds of people believed to belong to possible sleeper cells for terror organizations.

In an interview with The Associated Press, Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve laid out the increasingly urgent question for intelligence services: How to identify when someone transforms from a disgruntled criminal into a terrorist and how to block that radicalization.

The man behind the Copenhagen shootings last weekend was known to the Danish security service and may have been radicalized during a jail stint, just like at least two of the Paris gunmen.

Cazeneuve wants new laws to give intelligence services more leeway to monitor electronic communications and is heading to the United States this week to talk to Internet giants about stemming online propaganda.