World

EU leaders plan to broaden anti-terror drive at Thursday summit, seek tougher border controls

  • Flowers are laid near the headquarters of magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, Friday Feb. 6, 2015. Brothers Said and Cherif Kouachi killed 12 people in a terror attack at the offices of French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo on Jan. 7. The two gunmen, were killed by French police two days later. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

    Flowers are laid near the headquarters of magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, Friday Feb. 6, 2015. Brothers Said and Cherif Kouachi killed 12 people in a terror attack at the offices of French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo on Jan. 7. The two gunmen, were killed by French police two days later. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)  (The Associated Press)

  • A woman looks at flowers laid near the headquarters of magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, Friday Feb. 6, 2015. Brothers Said and Cherif Kouachi killed 12 people in a terror attack at the offices of French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo on Jan. 7. The two gunmen, were killed by French police two days later. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

    A woman looks at flowers laid near the headquarters of magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, Friday Feb. 6, 2015. Brothers Said and Cherif Kouachi killed 12 people in a terror attack at the offices of French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo on Jan. 7. The two gunmen, were killed by French police two days later. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)  (The Associated Press)

European Union leaders plan to call next week for tougher border checks to stop foreign fighters, the swift adoption of an air passenger information deal and increased intelligence sharing.

A draft of the statement for next Thursday's summit, obtained Friday by The Associated Press, said "the security of citizens is an immediate necessity. We must better implement the tools we have and develop them further."

The leaders will also call for the monitoring and removal of Internet content that promotes terrorism and new projects to boost the counter-terrorism abilities of Middle East and North African countries.

The 28-nation EU has been spurred into an anti-terror drive by the deadly terror attacks in France last month and a series of police raids targeting those who go abroad for jihad.