World

Lawyers seek judicial review of ICC prosecutor's refusal to investigate Gaza flotilla deaths

Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda of Gambia looks up as she waits for the start of the proceedings against Dominic Ongwen, a Ugandan commander in warlord Joseph Kony's feared militia, made his first appearance before judges at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Ongwen arrived in The Hague last week after being taken into custody in Central African Republic. He faces war crimes and crimes against humanity charges for his alleged role in a reign of terror that has spanned more than 25 years in central Africa's Great Lakes region. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)

Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda of Gambia looks up as she waits for the start of the proceedings against Dominic Ongwen, a Ugandan commander in warlord Joseph Kony's feared militia, made his first appearance before judges at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Ongwen arrived in The Hague last week after being taken into custody in Central African Republic. He faces war crimes and crimes against humanity charges for his alleged role in a reign of terror that has spanned more than 25 years in central Africa's Great Lakes region. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

Lawyers are calling for a review of the International Criminal Court prosecutor's decision not to investigate the storming by Israel of an aid flotilla that was heading to Gaza.

A team of lawyers representing the government of Comoros filed a request Thursday for the court to order Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda to reconsider her refusal to launch a probe into the May 31, 2010, storming of one of the vessels in the flotilla, which was sailing under a Comoros flag.

Bensouda said in November last year that there was a "reasonable basis to believe that war crimes" were committed on the Mavi Marmara, where eight Turks and one Turkish-American were killed by Israeli commandos, but that the case wasn't "of sufficient gravity" to merit an ICC case.