Doctors Without Borders says it resumed providing medical aid in December in troubled Rakhine state in western Myanmar after being excluded for more than nine months.

The government suspended the aid group's activities last February, accusing it of lacking transparency in its work. It was thought to be angry because the agency employed members of the Rohingya minority.

Violence mostly directed by Buddhists against the Rohingya in the past few years has left about 300 people dead and forced another 140,000 to leave their homes and live in camps.

Visiting U.N. human rights envoy Yanghee Lee said last week that the resumption of medical services was a step forward, but that the situation for the displaced Rohingya remained dire.