A Rome court has convicted six men of spreading pro-fascist and anti-Semitic ideas with banners, posters and graffiti in the Italian capital.

A 1993 law forbids use of slogans, gestures and actions evoking Nazi and fascist ideologies or inciting racial hatred.

Sentences for the convictions Tuesday ranged from 1 ½ years to eight months. A seventh defendant was acquitted.

Two of those sentenced had previously been convicted in a separate case of attempting to re-establish the Fascist party, the legacy of 20th-century dictator Benito Mussolini.

Rome Jewish community spokesman Fabio Perugia says the verdict rendered a "clear-cut condemnation of neo-fascism and of all racist and xenophobic cultures."

The graffiti and posters targeting the city's tiny Jewish community and its leaders were spotted in several neighborhoods from 2008-2011.