World

After Paris attacks some of Europe's police reconsider their weapons to counter terror

  • German police officers patrol in a terminal at the airport in Frankfurt, Germany, Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. Security concerns across Europe have been heightened following the terror attacks in Paris, in which 17 people were killed. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)

    German police officers patrol in a terminal at the airport in Frankfurt, Germany, Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. Security concerns across Europe have been heightened following the terror attacks in Paris, in which 17 people were killed. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)  (The Associated Press)

  • German police officers patrol in a terminal at the airport in Frankfurt, Germany, Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. Security concerns across Europe have been heightened following the terror attacks in Paris, in which 17 people were killed. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)

    German police officers patrol in a terminal at the airport in Frankfurt, Germany, Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. Security concerns across Europe have been heightened following the terror attacks in Paris, in which 17 people were killed. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)  (The Associated Press)

  • A Belgian soldier patrols in front of EU headquarters in Brussels on Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. Security has been stepped up after thirteen people were detained in Belgium in an anti-terror sweep following a firefight in Verviers, in which two suspected terrorists were killed. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

    A Belgian soldier patrols in front of EU headquarters in Brussels on Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. Security has been stepped up after thirteen people were detained in Belgium in an anti-terror sweep following a firefight in Verviers, in which two suspected terrorists were killed. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)  (The Associated Press)

Police in France are demanding more heavy weapons after three days of terror attacks around Paris that left three officers among the dead.

Two officers died Jan. 7 during the massacre at the Charlie Hebdo newspaper that left 12 dead — the armed police bodyguard of the editor, and a street officer who was among the first to respond. The following day, an unarmed policewoman was killed on the outskirts of the French capital.

Police unions met Monday with top officials from the Interior Ministry, pressing for heavy weapons and protective gear, better training for first-responders, and more legal tools to guard against terrorists.

Twenty people, including three gunmen, ultimately died in the attacks targeting the paper and a kosher supermarket.