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Russian opposition figure says he's paid authorities for cutting off house-arrest bracelet

  • Russian opposition activist and anti-corruption crusader Alexei Navalny arrives at Radio Echo Moskvy in Moscow, Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015, as he defies his house arrest to speak on Radio Echo Moskvy on Wednesday.  Navalny has been convicted of fraud and given a suspended sentence, but is under house arrest pending his appeal. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

    Russian opposition activist and anti-corruption crusader Alexei Navalny arrives at Radio Echo Moskvy in Moscow, Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015, as he defies his house arrest to speak on Radio Echo Moskvy on Wednesday. Navalny has been convicted of fraud and given a suspended sentence, but is under house arrest pending his appeal. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)  (The Associated Press)

  • Russian opposition activist and anti-corruption crusader Alexei Navalny arrives at Radio Echo Moskvy in Moscow, Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015, as he defies his house arrest to speak on Radio Echo Moskvy on Wednesday.  Navalny has been convicted of fraud and given a suspended sentence, but is under house arrest pending his appeal. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

    Russian opposition activist and anti-corruption crusader Alexei Navalny arrives at Radio Echo Moskvy in Moscow, Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015, as he defies his house arrest to speak on Radio Echo Moskvy on Wednesday. Navalny has been convicted of fraud and given a suspended sentence, but is under house arrest pending his appeal. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)  (The Associated Press)

Leading Russian opposition figure Alexei Navalny says he has paid the state for the electronic bracelet that he cut off to protest his house arrest.

Navalny, an anti-corruption campaigner and vehement foe of President Vladimir Putin, was convicted in late December of fraud and given a 3 ½-year suspended sentence. But the court said he must remain under house arrest until his appeals are exhausted.

Navalny claims that's illegal and earlier this month he said he had sawed off the device monitoring his house arrest.

On Wednesday, he left home to speak on Ekho Moskvy radio, saying he had paid the federal prison service the 670 rubles ($10) he owed for the ruined bracelet.

"When they put the electronic bracelet on me, I signed a receipt," he explained.