TERROR

EU lawyers check legality of terror finance deal with US amid calls to renegotiate agreement

  • European Parliament President Martin Schulz addresses bystanders during a gathering to pay respect to the victims of Wednesday's terror attack in Paris, in front of the European Parliament in Brussels, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. Eight journalists, two police officers, a maintenance worker and a visitor were killed, and eleven people wounded in a terrorist attack against French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris. (AP Photo/Yves Logghe)

    European Parliament President Martin Schulz addresses bystanders during a gathering to pay respect to the victims of Wednesday's terror attack in Paris, in front of the European Parliament in Brussels, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. Eight journalists, two police officers, a maintenance worker and a visitor were killed, and eleven people wounded in a terrorist attack against French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris. (AP Photo/Yves Logghe)  (The Associated Press)

  • European Parliament President Martin Schulz shows a sticker that reads: 'Je suis Charlie (I Am Charlie)', during a gathering to pay respect to the victims of Wednesday's terror attack in Paris, in front of the European Parliament in Brussels, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. Eight journalists, two police officers, a maintenance worker and a visitor were killed, and eleven people wounded in a terrorist attack against French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris. (AP Photo/Yves Logghe)

    European Parliament President Martin Schulz shows a sticker that reads: 'Je suis Charlie (I Am Charlie)', during a gathering to pay respect to the victims of Wednesday's terror attack in Paris, in front of the European Parliament in Brussels, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. Eight journalists, two police officers, a maintenance worker and a visitor were killed, and eleven people wounded in a terrorist attack against French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris. (AP Photo/Yves Logghe)  (The Associated Press)

European Union lawyers are examining whether parts of a deal with the United States on tracking terrorist finances are legal amid calls to renegotiate the entire agreement.

European Parliament civil liberties committee chairman Claude Moraes said Thursday that there is "a legal issue here, about the legality and validity" of parts of the Terrorist Finance Tracking Program.

The problem relates to EU oversight of the conditions under which the U.S. Treasury can access the SWIFT system overseeing international bank transfers.

Ombudswoman Emily O'Reilly said the U.S. Treasury is denying her access to a report on how that agreement is being handled. O'Reilly said that "for the first time in its 20-year history, the European ombudsman was denied its right under statute." European parliament lawyers are now looking into the deal.