World

Tunisians choose between stability and change in runoff presidential vote

  • Tunisian presidential candidate Beji Caid Essebsi , right, delivers his speech during his last campaign rally in Tunis, Friday, Dec. 19, 2014. Tunisians must decide Sunday between Beji Caid Essebsi, an 88-year-old veteran of previous regimes, and Moncef Marzouki, a 75-year-old human rights activist who is the outgoing interim president. For the third time in just two months, Tunisian voters will head to the polls this weekend, this time to elect a president in a runoff vote that presents a stark choice between the country's past and its Arab Spring revolution. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)

    Tunisian presidential candidate Beji Caid Essebsi , right, delivers his speech during his last campaign rally in Tunis, Friday, Dec. 19, 2014. Tunisians must decide Sunday between Beji Caid Essebsi, an 88-year-old veteran of previous regimes, and Moncef Marzouki, a 75-year-old human rights activist who is the outgoing interim president. For the third time in just two months, Tunisian voters will head to the polls this weekend, this time to elect a president in a runoff vote that presents a stark choice between the country's past and its Arab Spring revolution. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)  (The Associated Press)

  • Tunisians check voters' ID prior to cast their ballots in a polling station in Tunis, Tunisia, Sunday, Dec. 21, 2014.  Tunisians voted on Sunday for a new president in a runoff between a symbol of the country's previous regimes and a veteran human rights activist that came to power after the revolution of 2011.(AP Photo/Ilyess Osmane)

    Tunisians check voters' ID prior to cast their ballots in a polling station in Tunis, Tunisia, Sunday, Dec. 21, 2014. Tunisians voted on Sunday for a new president in a runoff between a symbol of the country's previous regimes and a veteran human rights activist that came to power after the revolution of 2011.(AP Photo/Ilyess Osmane)  (The Associated Press)

  • Women share a laugh in front of a polling station in Tunis, Tunisia, Sunday, Dec. 21, 2014.  Tunisians voted on Sunday for a new president in a runoff between a symbol of the country's previous regimes and a veteran human rights activist that came to power after the revolution of 2011.(AP Photo/Ilyess Osmane)

    Women share a laugh in front of a polling station in Tunis, Tunisia, Sunday, Dec. 21, 2014. Tunisians voted on Sunday for a new president in a runoff between a symbol of the country's previous regimes and a veteran human rights activist that came to power after the revolution of 2011.(AP Photo/Ilyess Osmane)  (The Associated Press)

Tunisians are heading to vote for a president in a runoff between a symbol of the country's previous regimes and a veteran human rights activist that came to power after the revolution of 2011.

Sunday's runoff between the two candidates is the third election in the last two months and represents the final stage in the country's democratic transition. A parliament was elected in October.

The eve of the election was marked by violence with a shotgun blast wounding a soldier near the city of Kairouan. Extremists vowed further attacks on security forces in a video that surfaced on social networks Wednesday.

According to authorities, around 100,000 police and soldiers will secure the polls and certain stations in the border regions with Algeria will have shorter hours for security.