World

Mideast peace push at UN puts Obama administration in difficult spot between allies

  • US Secretary of State John Kerry talks before meeting with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov at Villa Taverna, on Sunday, Dec. 14, 2014, in Rome. Kerry and Lavrov discussed the ongoing Middle East peace process, and rising tensions in Ukraine. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Pool)

    US Secretary of State John Kerry talks before meeting with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov at Villa Taverna, on Sunday, Dec. 14, 2014, in Rome. Kerry and Lavrov discussed the ongoing Middle East peace process, and rising tensions in Ukraine. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

  • US Secretary of State John Kerry, second left, is served a drink before talks with German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier, left, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, center right sitting, and British Foreign Minister Philip Hammond, right sitting, in Paris on Monday Dec. 15, 2014. Secretary of State John Kerry met Monday with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as the U.S. and Israel developed their responses to a draft U.N. resolution that would set a two-year timetable for an Israeli-Palestinian peace accord. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Pool)

    US Secretary of State John Kerry, second left, is served a drink before talks with German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier, left, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, center right sitting, and British Foreign Minister Philip Hammond, right sitting, in Paris on Monday Dec. 15, 2014. Secretary of State John Kerry met Monday with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as the U.S. and Israel developed their responses to a draft U.N. resolution that would set a two-year timetable for an Israeli-Palestinian peace accord. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

  • US Secretary of State John Kerry, third left, talks with German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier, left, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, second left, and British Foreign Minister Philip Hammond in Paris on Monday Dec. 15, 2014. Secretary of State John Kerry met Monday with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as the U.S. and Israel developed their responses to a draft U.N. resolution that would set a two-year timetable for an Israeli-Palestinian peace accord. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Pool)

    US Secretary of State John Kerry, third left, talks with German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier, left, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, second left, and British Foreign Minister Philip Hammond in Paris on Monday Dec. 15, 2014. Secretary of State John Kerry met Monday with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as the U.S. and Israel developed their responses to a draft U.N. resolution that would set a two-year timetable for an Israeli-Palestinian peace accord. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

The Obama administration is in a diplomatic bind on the Mideast as Secretary of State John Kerry meets with top Israeli and Palestinian officials in Europe this week.

The U.S. is reluctant to do anything right now that can be perceived as interference in Israel's elections while being pressed by close allies to endorse an Israeli-Palestinian negotiating framework that largely adheres to U.S. policy.

France is drafting the U.N. resolution, which would set a two-year timetable for talks.

Washington has long opposed the Security Council imposing a framework for Israeli-Palestinian negotiations. But for the U.S., simply vetoing the plan could have pitfalls.

A veto would upset Palestinians and perhaps some Arab allies frustrated by years of diplomatic gridlock. And it might anger European countries that want to broaden peace efforts.