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UK leader exits Belfast peace talks after offering extra money; Sinn Fein slams offer

  • The British Prime Minister, David Cameron, right, and Irish Prime Minister, Enda Kenny, speak to the media at Stormont, Belfast, Northern Ireland, Friday, Dec. 12, 2014.  The two Prime Ministers spoke to the media after leaving multi-party negations on saving the Northern Ireland's power-sharing government, a peacemaking alliance at risk of collapse. (AP Photo)

    The British Prime Minister, David Cameron, right, and Irish Prime Minister, Enda Kenny, speak to the media at Stormont, Belfast, Northern Ireland, Friday, Dec. 12, 2014. The two Prime Ministers spoke to the media after leaving multi-party negations on saving the Northern Ireland's power-sharing government, a peacemaking alliance at risk of collapse. (AP Photo)  (The Associated Press)

  • Democratic Unionist Party leader Peter Robinson speaks to the media at Stormont, Belfast, Northern Ireland, Friday, Dec. 12, 2014.  The British and Irish Prime Ministers left peace talks early Friday were they had been in multi-party negotiations on saving Northern Ireland's power sharing government.  (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)

    Democratic Unionist Party leader Peter Robinson speaks to the media at Stormont, Belfast, Northern Ireland, Friday, Dec. 12, 2014. The British and Irish Prime Ministers left peace talks early Friday were they had been in multi-party negotiations on saving Northern Ireland's power sharing government. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)  (The Associated Press)

  • Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness, left, Michelle O'Neill, Gerry Kelly and party president Gerry Adams, right, speak to the media at Stormont, Belfast, Northern Ireland, Friday, Dec. 12, 2014.  The British and Irish Prime Ministers left peace talks early Friday were they had been in multi-party negotiations on saving Northern Ireland's power sharing government.  (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)

    Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness, left, Michelle O'Neill, Gerry Kelly and party president Gerry Adams, right, speak to the media at Stormont, Belfast, Northern Ireland, Friday, Dec. 12, 2014. The British and Irish Prime Ministers left peace talks early Friday were they had been in multi-party negotiations on saving Northern Ireland's power sharing government. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)  (The Associated Press)

British Prime Minister David Cameron has left Northern Ireland peace talks after making a conditional offer of extra money for the region's Catholic-Protestant government, but local leaders dismissed his pledge as bogus.

Friday's early exit by Cameron from the talks dashed hopes of reaching a wider agreement to sustain power-sharing, the central achievement of Northern Ireland's 1998 peace accord.

Cameron billed his overnight talks with rival Protestant and Catholic leaders as productive. He said he offered them an extra 1 billion pounds ($1.6 billion) on condition they resolved several other disputes undermining their five-party administration.

Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams, whose nationalist party represents most Catholics, called Cameron's intervention irresponsible and amateurish. Protestant politicians blamed both Sinn Fein and Cameron for the impasse.