World

Spain sets stiff fines for unauthorized protests, allows summary expulsion of migrants

  • Protestors muzzle themselves and act out a mock funeral during a pro-civil rights demonstration in the main square of Madrid, Spain, Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. Demonstrators march to protest against a wave of repressive laws and reforms by the conservative Popular Party government, that include draft legislation that will set heavy fines for offences such as causing disturbances outside parliament, burning the national flag, insulting the state or taking part in unauthorised or prohibited protests at strategic installations. The law will vote it on in the Parliament Thursday. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)

    Protestors muzzle themselves and act out a mock funeral during a pro-civil rights demonstration in the main square of Madrid, Spain, Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. Demonstrators march to protest against a wave of repressive laws and reforms by the conservative Popular Party government, that include draft legislation that will set heavy fines for offences such as causing disturbances outside parliament, burning the national flag, insulting the state or taking part in unauthorised or prohibited protests at strategic installations. The law will vote it on in the Parliament Thursday. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)  (The Associated Press)

  • Protestors light candles placed around a sign reading "Fear" as they act out a mock funeral during a pro-civil rights demonstration in the main square of Madrid, Spain, Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. Demonstrators march to protest against a wave of repressive laws and reforms by the conservative Popular Party government, that include draft legislation that will set heavy fines for offences such as causing disturbances outside parliament, burning the national flag, insulting the state or taking part in unauthorised or prohibited protests at strategic installations. The law will vote it on in the Parliament Thursday. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)

    Protestors light candles placed around a sign reading "Fear" as they act out a mock funeral during a pro-civil rights demonstration in the main square of Madrid, Spain, Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. Demonstrators march to protest against a wave of repressive laws and reforms by the conservative Popular Party government, that include draft legislation that will set heavy fines for offences such as causing disturbances outside parliament, burning the national flag, insulting the state or taking part in unauthorised or prohibited protests at strategic installations. The law will vote it on in the Parliament Thursday. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)  (The Associated Press)

  • Protestors act out a mock funeral during a pro-civil rights demonstration in Madrid, Spain, Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. Demonstrators march to protest against a wave of repressive laws and reforms by the conservative Popular Party government, that include draft legislation that will set heavy fines for offences such as causing disturbances outside parliament, burning the national flag, insulting the state or taking part in unauthorised or prohibited protests at strategic installations. The law will vote it on in the Parliament Thursday. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)

    Protestors act out a mock funeral during a pro-civil rights demonstration in Madrid, Spain, Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. Demonstrators march to protest against a wave of repressive laws and reforms by the conservative Popular Party government, that include draft legislation that will set heavy fines for offences such as causing disturbances outside parliament, burning the national flag, insulting the state or taking part in unauthorised or prohibited protests at strategic installations. The law will vote it on in the Parliament Thursday. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)  (The Associated Press)

Spain's lower house of parliament has approved legislation that allows for the summary expulsion of migrants entering the country's North African enclaves illegally and hefty fines for protests outside parliament buildings or strategic installations.

The Public Security Law was approved in a 181-141 vote Thursday after being heavily criticized by opposition parties and judicial and social groups as an attempt by the conservative government to muzzle protests over its handling of the severe economic crisis.

The measures, which update a 1992 law, also include fines of up to 30,000 euros ($37,000) for disseminating photographs of police officers that endanger them or police operations.

Spanish cities have been the scene of weekly mostly peaceful protests since the onset of the crisis in 2008.