World

Brazil Truth Commission delivers final report on dictatorship's brutality, seeks amnesty's end

  • Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff cries during a speech at the launching ceremony of the National Truth Commission Report, at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. Brazil's National Truth Commission delivered a damning report on the killings, disappearances and acts of torture committed by government agents during the country's 1964-1985 military dictatorship. It called for those responsible to face prosecution. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff cries during a speech at the launching ceremony of the National Truth Commission Report, at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. Brazil's National Truth Commission delivered a damning report on the killings, disappearances and acts of torture committed by government agents during the country's 1964-1985 military dictatorship. It called for those responsible to face prosecution. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)  (The Associated Press)

  • Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff, left, receives report from the President of the National Truth Commission Pedro Dallari, during the launching ceremony of the National Truth Commission Report, at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. Brazil's National Truth Commission on Wednesday delivered a damning report on the killings, disappearances and acts of torture committed by government agents during the country's 1964-1985 military dictatorship. It called for those responsible to face prosecution. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff, left, receives report from the President of the National Truth Commission Pedro Dallari, during the launching ceremony of the National Truth Commission Report, at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. Brazil's National Truth Commission on Wednesday delivered a damning report on the killings, disappearances and acts of torture committed by government agents during the country's 1964-1985 military dictatorship. It called for those responsible to face prosecution. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)  (The Associated Press)

  • Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff cries during a speech at the launching ceremony of the National Truth Commission Report, at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. Brazil's National Truth Commission on Wednesday delivered a damning report on the killings, disappearances and acts of torture committed by government agents during the country's 1964-1985 military dictatorship. The 2,000-page report was delivered to President Rousseff, a former Marxist guerrilla who endured harsh torture and a long imprisonment in the early 1970s. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff cries during a speech at the launching ceremony of the National Truth Commission Report, at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. Brazil's National Truth Commission on Wednesday delivered a damning report on the killings, disappearances and acts of torture committed by government agents during the country's 1964-1985 military dictatorship. The 2,000-page report was delivered to President Rousseff, a former Marxist guerrilla who endured harsh torture and a long imprisonment in the early 1970s. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)  (The Associated Press)

Brazil's National Truth Commission has delivered its final report documenting acts of torture, disappearances and killings committed during the South American nation's 1964-85 military dictatorship.

Commission members on Wednesday presented the findings of the nearly 3-year-long investigation to President Dilma Rousseff, a former Marxist guerrilla who suffered a long imprisonment and torture during the dictatorship.

The report documents 434 politically motivated killings and disappearances under the dictatorship — and when possible gives the names of those responsible.

But the commission, created by congress and sworn in three years ago, called for changing the 1979 amnesty law still shields military personnel from possible prosecution.

Brazil's neighbors Argentina, Chile and Uruguay have all prosecuted those responsible for atrocities committed under their military dictatorships during the Cold War era.