World

AP Newsbreak: Bosnia-based missing persons commission will become a permanent global body

  • FILE - In this Thursday, July 7, 2011 file photo Bosnian worker Ermin Nuhanovic carries bags of body remains during a process of reassociation and identification of human remains, exhumed from mass graves and identified by DNA, in the identification center in Tuzla, 140 kms north from Sarajevo,Bosnia. A Bosnia-based commission that has pioneered a DNA-based system to find and identify the remains of people missing in conflicts and natural disasters will become a permanent global body helping track down millions of missing around the world, officials said Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. (AP Photo/Amel Emric, File)

    FILE - In this Thursday, July 7, 2011 file photo Bosnian worker Ermin Nuhanovic carries bags of body remains during a process of reassociation and identification of human remains, exhumed from mass graves and identified by DNA, in the identification center in Tuzla, 140 kms north from Sarajevo,Bosnia. A Bosnia-based commission that has pioneered a DNA-based system to find and identify the remains of people missing in conflicts and natural disasters will become a permanent global body helping track down millions of missing around the world, officials said Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. (AP Photo/Amel Emric, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Wednesday, July 9, 2014 file photo, a Bosnian Muslim woman cries near the coffin of her relative, in the Memorial center in Potocari, 200 kms northeast of Sarajevo. A Bosnia-based commission that has pioneered a DNA-based system to find and identify the remains of people missing in conflicts and natural disasters will become a permanent global body helping track down millions of missing around the world, officials said Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014.  (AP Photo/Amel Emric, File)

    FILE - In this Wednesday, July 9, 2014 file photo, a Bosnian Muslim woman cries near the coffin of her relative, in the Memorial center in Potocari, 200 kms northeast of Sarajevo. A Bosnia-based commission that has pioneered a DNA-based system to find and identify the remains of people missing in conflicts and natural disasters will become a permanent global body helping track down millions of missing around the world, officials said Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. (AP Photo/Amel Emric, File)  (The Associated Press)

A Bosnia-based commission that has pioneered a DNA-based system to find and identify the remains of people missing in conflicts and natural disasters will become a permanent global body helping track down millions of missing around the world.

The International Commission on Missing Persons was established in 1996 to help find people missing from the Yugoslav wars. So far it has found and identified 70 percent of the 40,000 missing people. That achievement is "unprecedented" the head of the ICMP, Kathryne Bomberger, told The Associated Press on Thursday.

She said the institution will be granted permanent international legal status this month. The expertise developed by the ICMP and the Bosnian government will become a global model for countries with missing persons problems.