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Sweden's left-leaning minority government in crisis after far-right revolt

  • Sweden's Prime Minister Stefan Lofven, Social Democrats, second from right, talks at a press conference at the chancellery in Stockholm, Sweden, late Tuesday Dec. 2, 2014. He is surrounded by, from left, Minister of Education Gustav Fridolin and Deputy Prime Minister Asa Romson of the Green Party and Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson of the Social Democrats. Lofven said the government's talks with the center-right opposition had not resulted in their support for the government's national budget. (AP Photo/TT News Agency, Pontus Lundahl)    SWEDEN OUT

    Sweden's Prime Minister Stefan Lofven, Social Democrats, second from right, talks at a press conference at the chancellery in Stockholm, Sweden, late Tuesday Dec. 2, 2014. He is surrounded by, from left, Minister of Education Gustav Fridolin and Deputy Prime Minister Asa Romson of the Green Party and Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson of the Social Democrats. Lofven said the government's talks with the center-right opposition had not resulted in their support for the government's national budget. (AP Photo/TT News Agency, Pontus Lundahl) SWEDEN OUT  (The Associated Press)

  • Sweden's party leaders of the center-right opposition leave the chancellery in Stockholm, Sweden, late Tuesday Dec. 2, 2014, after talks with the center-left government about the national budget. From left Anna Kinberg Batra, Moderates; Goran Hagglund (hidden), Christian Democrats; Annie Loof, Center Party and Jan Bjorklund, Liberals.  (AP Photo/TT News Agency, Maja Suslin)    SWEDEN OUT

    Sweden's party leaders of the center-right opposition leave the chancellery in Stockholm, Sweden, late Tuesday Dec. 2, 2014, after talks with the center-left government about the national budget. From left Anna Kinberg Batra, Moderates; Goran Hagglund (hidden), Christian Democrats; Annie Loof, Center Party and Jan Bjorklund, Liberals. (AP Photo/TT News Agency, Maja Suslin) SWEDEN OUT  (The Associated Press)

Sweden's lawmakers have started debating the budget proposals of the minority government which faces a vote of no confidence in Parliament after a far-right party said it would side with the opposition to force the left-leaning coalition to resign.

After late-night talks with government partners and center-right opposition parties, Social Democrat Prime Minister Stefan Lofven said he would wait until the debate to decide whether to step down.

Lofven also could withdraw the budget proposal for further consideration, which would postpone Wednesday's vote or wait until Dec. 29 to call a new election.

The right-wing Sweden Democrats, which all other parties oppose because of its strong anti-immigrant stand, said its aim is to force the collapse of the government by siding with the center-right opposition in the budget vote.