World

Ever warmer; UN weather agency says 2014 on track for hottest year

  • People gather near the Chinamacocha lake in the Huascaran National Park in Huaraz, Peru, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014. Glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    People gather near the Chinamacocha lake in the Huascaran National Park in Huaraz, Peru, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014. Glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)  (The Associated Press)

  • Julio Mejia, 56, prepares sacks of peas in Yungay, Peru, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014. Mejia claims that due to global warming, each year there is less rain and his crops are affected. In Peru glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    Julio Mejia, 56, prepares sacks of peas in Yungay, Peru, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014. Mejia claims that due to global warming, each year there is less rain and his crops are affected. In Peru glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)  (The Associated Press)

  • The Huascaran glacier is seen in the Huascaran National Park in Huaraz, Peru, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014. Glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    The Huascaran glacier is seen in the Huascaran National Park in Huaraz, Peru, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014. Glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)  (The Associated Press)

The U.N. weather agency says this year is currently tied for the hottest on record.

And it says all signs indicate the world keeps getting warmer.

The World Meteorological Organization announced at the U.N. climate conference in Lima, Peru that the global average temperature through the end of September was 0.57 Celsius (1.03 Fahrenheit) above average. That's the same as in 2010 — the record hot year.

The agency's secretary general said in a statement that there is no standstill in global warming, which scientists blame largely on humanity's burning of fossil fuels. Michel Jarraud also said that 14 of the 15th warmest years on record have all occurred in the 21st century.