World

Appeals judges at the International Criminal Court uphold conviction of Congolese war lord

  • Congolese militia leader Thomas Lubanga who was convicted in March 2012 of recruiting and using child soldiers in 2002 and 2003, speaks to his lawyer as he waits for the judges to rule on his appeal at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Monday Dec. 1, 2014. Appeals judges at the International Criminal Court have upheld the conviction of a Lubanga who had been sentenced to 14 years for recruiting and using child soldiers, bringing to an end the court’s first trial which was hailed as a landmark in international justice and a deterrent that would resonate around the world. (AP Photo/Michael Kooren, Pool)

    Congolese militia leader Thomas Lubanga who was convicted in March 2012 of recruiting and using child soldiers in 2002 and 2003, speaks to his lawyer as he waits for the judges to rule on his appeal at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Monday Dec. 1, 2014. Appeals judges at the International Criminal Court have upheld the conviction of a Lubanga who had been sentenced to 14 years for recruiting and using child soldiers, bringing to an end the court’s first trial which was hailed as a landmark in international justice and a deterrent that would resonate around the world. (AP Photo/Michael Kooren, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

  • Congolese militia leader Thomas Lubanga  who was convicted in March 2012 of recruiting and using child soldiers in 2002 and 2003, smiles when talking to his lawyer as he waits for the judges to rule on his appeal at the International Criminal Court in The Hague Monday Dec. 1, 2014. Appeals judges at the International Criminal Court have upheld the conviction of a Lubanga who had been sentenced to 14 years for recruiting and using child soldiers, bringing to an end the court's first trial which was hailed as a landmark in international justice and a deterrent that would resonate around the world. (AP Photo/Michael Kooren, Pool)

    Congolese militia leader Thomas Lubanga who was convicted in March 2012 of recruiting and using child soldiers in 2002 and 2003, smiles when talking to his lawyer as he waits for the judges to rule on his appeal at the International Criminal Court in The Hague Monday Dec. 1, 2014. Appeals judges at the International Criminal Court have upheld the conviction of a Lubanga who had been sentenced to 14 years for recruiting and using child soldiers, bringing to an end the court's first trial which was hailed as a landmark in international justice and a deterrent that would resonate around the world. (AP Photo/Michael Kooren, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

  • Congolese militia leader Thomas Lubanga, second left, who was convicted in March 2012 of recruiting and using child soldiers in 2002 and 2003, talks to his defence team as he waits for the judges to rule on his appeal at the International Criminal Court in The Hague Monday Dec. 1, 2014. Appeals judges at the International Criminal Court have upheld the conviction of a Lubanga who had been sentenced to 14 years for recruiting and using child soldiers, bringing to an end the court's first trial which was hailed as a landmark in international justice and a deterrent that would resonate around the world. (AP Photo/Michael Kooren, Pool)

    Congolese militia leader Thomas Lubanga, second left, who was convicted in March 2012 of recruiting and using child soldiers in 2002 and 2003, talks to his defence team as he waits for the judges to rule on his appeal at the International Criminal Court in The Hague Monday Dec. 1, 2014. Appeals judges at the International Criminal Court have upheld the conviction of a Lubanga who had been sentenced to 14 years for recruiting and using child soldiers, bringing to an end the court's first trial which was hailed as a landmark in international justice and a deterrent that would resonate around the world. (AP Photo/Michael Kooren, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

Appeals judges at the International Criminal Court have upheld the conviction of a Congolese war lord who was sentenced to 14 years for recruiting and using child soldiers, bringing to an end the court's first trial.

Thomas Lubanga was convicted in March 2012 of recruiting and using child soldiers in 2002 and 2003, in a verdict hailed as a landmark in international justice and a deterrent that would resonate around the world.

Lubanga, 53, was the first suspect convicted by the international court, 10 years after its creation.

Presiding judge Erkki Kourula on Monday said the five-judge appeals panel rejected all of Lubanga's seven grounds of appeal in a majority decision.