World

Myanmar students threaten nationwide protests over restrictive education law

  • In this Nov. 17, 2014 photo,  a university student holds an alms bowl rotated upside down, a sign of protest to government, as they march to protest against National Education Law in downtown Yangon, Myanmar. Students in Myanmar are threatening to hold nationwide protests unless the government amends an education law that they say restricts their academic freedom and prohibits them from engaging in political activities. After rallying in the streets of Yangon for four consecutive days Monday - and defying the threat of arrest - they gave the government 60 days to meet their demands.(AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)

    In this Nov. 17, 2014 photo, a university student holds an alms bowl rotated upside down, a sign of protest to government, as they march to protest against National Education Law in downtown Yangon, Myanmar. Students in Myanmar are threatening to hold nationwide protests unless the government amends an education law that they say restricts their academic freedom and prohibits them from engaging in political activities. After rallying in the streets of Yangon for four consecutive days Monday - and defying the threat of arrest - they gave the government 60 days to meet their demands.(AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Nov. 17, 2014 photo, university students hold placards and shout slogans as they march to protest against National Education Law in downtown Yangon, Myanmar. Students in Myanmar are threatening to hold nationwide protests unless the government amends an education law that they say restricts their academic freedom and prohibits them from engaging in political activities. After rallying in the streets of Yangon for four consecutive days Monday - and defying the threat of arrest - they gave the government 60 days to meet their demands.(AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)

    In this Nov. 17, 2014 photo, university students hold placards and shout slogans as they march to protest against National Education Law in downtown Yangon, Myanmar. Students in Myanmar are threatening to hold nationwide protests unless the government amends an education law that they say restricts their academic freedom and prohibits them from engaging in political activities. After rallying in the streets of Yangon for four consecutive days Monday - and defying the threat of arrest - they gave the government 60 days to meet their demands.(AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)  (The Associated Press)

  • Myanmar Education Minister Khin San Yi talks to journalists during a press briefing at Yangon University Campus Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014, in Yangon, Myanmar. Students in Myanmar are threatening to hold nationwide protests unless the government amends an education law that they say restricts their academic freedom and prohibits them from engaging in political activities. After rallying in the streets of Yangon for four consecutive days Monday - and defying the threat of arrest - they gave the government 60 days to meet their demands. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)

    Myanmar Education Minister Khin San Yi talks to journalists during a press briefing at Yangon University Campus Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014, in Yangon, Myanmar. Students in Myanmar are threatening to hold nationwide protests unless the government amends an education law that they say restricts their academic freedom and prohibits them from engaging in political activities. After rallying in the streets of Yangon for four consecutive days Monday - and defying the threat of arrest - they gave the government 60 days to meet their demands. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)  (The Associated Press)

Students in Myanmar are threatening to hold nationwide protests unless the government amends an education law that they say restricts their academic freedom and prohibits them from engaging in political activities.

After rallying in the streets of Yangon for four consecutive days Monday — and defying the threat of arrest — they gave the government 60 days to meet their demands.

They are seeking assurances colleges and universities will be free of the controls that crippled higher education in the past.

Among other things, they want the right to form student unions.

Myanmar has been grappling with political reforms since 2011, when the repressive junta ceded power to a government headed by ex-general President Thein Sein.

But experts say the education system still needs a complete overhaul.