World

Major economies don't say it with flowers: Brisbanites adjust to a town turned quiet by G-20

  • In this Thursday Nov. 13, 2014 photo, taxi driver Jimmy Khattra stands by his cab in the central business district ahead of the G-20 conference in Brisbane, Australia. Khatta said, "At this point of time it's quite quiet for us but we don't know what it will be like on Friday and Saturday, It might get busy, with so many delegates and maybe 20,000 people. So probably it gets busy." (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

    In this Thursday Nov. 13, 2014 photo, taxi driver Jimmy Khattra stands by his cab in the central business district ahead of the G-20 conference in Brisbane, Australia. Khatta said, "At this point of time it's quite quiet for us but we don't know what it will be like on Friday and Saturday, It might get busy, with so many delegates and maybe 20,000 people. So probably it gets busy." (AP Photo/Mark Baker)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014 photo, Brazilian food truck owner Carlo Xavier waits for customers ahead of the G-20 conference in Brisbane, Australia. Xavier said, "The G-20 I think has been good so far, we have gained a lot of business today in King George Square, so far it's been good." (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

    In this Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014 photo, Brazilian food truck owner Carlo Xavier waits for customers ahead of the G-20 conference in Brisbane, Australia. Xavier said, "The G-20 I think has been good so far, we have gained a lot of business today in King George Square, so far it's been good." (AP Photo/Mark Baker)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Thursday Nov. 13, 2014, photo coffee shop owner Brett Fitzpatrick stands in his shop in the central business district ahead of the G-20 conference in Brisbane, Australia. Fitzpatrick said that "the G-20 has been an opportunity for us to be exposed to different customers that are not a regular base for us, so it's been great." (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

    In this Thursday Nov. 13, 2014, photo coffee shop owner Brett Fitzpatrick stands in his shop in the central business district ahead of the G-20 conference in Brisbane, Australia. Fitzpatrick said that "the G-20 has been an opportunity for us to be exposed to different customers that are not a regular base for us, so it's been great." (AP Photo/Mark Baker)  (The Associated Press)

Life can be pretty quiet in the international spotlight for ordinary Brisbanites as their city hosts this year's G-20 summit of the world's biggest economies. "Ghost town" is a phrase some used as they watched locals leave town. Many shop owners saw business evaporate, while others closer to the action have gotten a better and more lucrative taste of global diplomacy.

Here are portraits of several Brisbane residents, and their thoughts on the summit, by Associated Press photographers Mark Baker, Tertius Pickard and Rob Griffith.