World

Parent : Mexico attorney general reports 6 bags of remains in missing student investigation

  • Students protest the disappearance of 43 students in the state of Guerrero, outside the general attorney's office in Mexico City, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014. The 43 students have received far more attention than other disappeared, in part because allegedly corrupt police in Iguala so clearly played a role in their disappearance. Officers there are alleged to have worked for the Guerreros Unidos drug gang, which authorities charge had ties to the former mayor of Iguala, Jose Luis Abarca, and his wife, Maria de los Angeles Pineda. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

    Students protest the disappearance of 43 students in the state of Guerrero, outside the general attorney's office in Mexico City, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014. The 43 students have received far more attention than other disappeared, in part because allegedly corrupt police in Iguala so clearly played a role in their disappearance. Officers there are alleged to have worked for the Guerreros Unidos drug gang, which authorities charge had ties to the former mayor of Iguala, Jose Luis Abarca, and his wife, Maria de los Angeles Pineda. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)  (The Associated Press)

  • Mexico's Attorney General, Jesus Murillo Karam, center left, wearing a blue vest, leaves a hangar after meeting with relatives of the 43 missing students at the airport in the state capital city of Chilpancingo, Mexico, Friday Nov. 7, 2014. Relatives of the missing students say Karam told them of finding six bags of unidentified human remains in the southern state of Guerrero near where their 43 sons disappeared Sept. 26. Karam could not say yet whether the remains were of the students, but the find opened a new avenue of investigation. (AP Photo/Alejandrino Gonzalez)

    Mexico's Attorney General, Jesus Murillo Karam, center left, wearing a blue vest, leaves a hangar after meeting with relatives of the 43 missing students at the airport in the state capital city of Chilpancingo, Mexico, Friday Nov. 7, 2014. Relatives of the missing students say Karam told them of finding six bags of unidentified human remains in the southern state of Guerrero near where their 43 sons disappeared Sept. 26. Karam could not say yet whether the remains were of the students, but the find opened a new avenue of investigation. (AP Photo/Alejandrino Gonzalez)  (The Associated Press)

  • Mexico's Attorney General, Jesus Murillo Karam, third from left wearing a vest, leaves a hangar after meeting with relatives of the 43 missing students, at the airport in the state capital city of Chilpancingo, Mexico, Friday Nov. 7, 2014. Relatives of the missing students say Karam told them of finding six bags of unidentified human remains in the southern state of Guerrero near where their 43 sons disappeared Sept. 26. Karam could not say yet whether the remains were of the students, but the find opened a new avenue of investigation. (AP Photo/Alejandrino Gonzalez)

    Mexico's Attorney General, Jesus Murillo Karam, third from left wearing a vest, leaves a hangar after meeting with relatives of the 43 missing students, at the airport in the state capital city of Chilpancingo, Mexico, Friday Nov. 7, 2014. Relatives of the missing students say Karam told them of finding six bags of unidentified human remains in the southern state of Guerrero near where their 43 sons disappeared Sept. 26. Karam could not say yet whether the remains were of the students, but the find opened a new avenue of investigation. (AP Photo/Alejandrino Gonzalez)  (The Associated Press)

Relatives of missing college students say Mexican authorities tell of finding six bags of unidentified human remains in the southern state of Guerrero near where their 43 sons disappeared Sept. 26.

Manuel Martinez says Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam told families Friday that authorities could not say yet whether the remains were of the students, but the find opened a new avenue of investigation.

The remains were located along a river in Cocula after confessions by two suspects.

Authorities say the Iguala city mayor sent police to intercept the students, who came to town to kcocollect money and had commandeered buses. Six people died in a police attack and prosecutors say 43 students were handed over to a drug gang. At least 59 people have been detained in the case.