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As world leaders head to Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi says reforms have stalled

  • Myanmar Opposition Leader Aung San Suu Kyi speaks during a press conference at National League for Democracy party headquarters Wednesday, Nov 5, 2014, in Yangon, Myanmar. Suu Kyi has a message for President Barack Obama and other world leaders as they head to Myanmar: The international community's faith in its military-dominated government came too early and too fast, and democratic reforms stalled long ago. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)

    Myanmar Opposition Leader Aung San Suu Kyi speaks during a press conference at National League for Democracy party headquarters Wednesday, Nov 5, 2014, in Yangon, Myanmar. Suu Kyi has a message for President Barack Obama and other world leaders as they head to Myanmar: The international community's faith in its military-dominated government came too early and too fast, and democratic reforms stalled long ago. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)  (The Associated Press)

  • Myanmar Opposition Leader Aung San Suu Kyi arrives for a press conference at National League for Democracy party headquarters Wednesday, Nov 5, 2014, in Yangon, Myanmar. Suu Kyi has a message for President Barack Obama and other world leaders as they head to Myanmar: The international community's faith in its military-dominated government came too early and too fast, and democratic reforms stalled long ago. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)

    Myanmar Opposition Leader Aung San Suu Kyi arrives for a press conference at National League for Democracy party headquarters Wednesday, Nov 5, 2014, in Yangon, Myanmar. Suu Kyi has a message for President Barack Obama and other world leaders as they head to Myanmar: The international community's faith in its military-dominated government came too early and too fast, and democratic reforms stalled long ago. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)  (The Associated Press)

Opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has a message for President Barack Obama and other world leaders as they head to Myanmar: The international community's faith in its military-dominated government came too early and too fast, and democratic reforms stalled long ago.

A regional summit next week in Myanmar's capital, Naypyitaw, will shine a spotlight on the country's progress toward democracy since an elected government took over from a military junta three years ago.

The United States and other Western nations have lifted most sanctions they imposed against the repressive former junta to reward and encourage the current government's reforms. But Suu Kyi said at a news conference Wednesday that President Thein Sein's reform process has stalled and Washington has been overly optimistic about its gains.