World

Germany: We want Britain as active EU member but workers' freedom of movement not negotiable

FILE - In this Feb. 27, 2014 file picture British Prime Minister, David Cameron, speaks with  German Chancellor Angela Merkel during their joint press conference inside 10 Downing Street in London. Chancellor Angela Merkel's spokesman says Germany wants Britain to remain an "active and committed" European Union member but is insisting the principle of free movement of workers within the bloc isn't negotiable. British Prime Minister David Cameron, facing political pressure from the rise of Britain's anti-EU UKIP party, wants to take steps to limit the level of migration from the EU into Britain. German weekly Der Spiegel reported Sunday Nov. 2, 2014 , without identifying sources, that German officials could envision giving up efforts to keep Britain in the EU if Cameron insists on limits.   (AP Photo/ Facundo Arrizabalaga, Poo,Filel)

FILE - In this Feb. 27, 2014 file picture British Prime Minister, David Cameron, speaks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel during their joint press conference inside 10 Downing Street in London. Chancellor Angela Merkel's spokesman says Germany wants Britain to remain an "active and committed" European Union member but is insisting the principle of free movement of workers within the bloc isn't negotiable. British Prime Minister David Cameron, facing political pressure from the rise of Britain's anti-EU UKIP party, wants to take steps to limit the level of migration from the EU into Britain. German weekly Der Spiegel reported Sunday Nov. 2, 2014 , without identifying sources, that German officials could envision giving up efforts to keep Britain in the EU if Cameron insists on limits. (AP Photo/ Facundo Arrizabalaga, Poo,Filel)  (The Associated Press)

Chancellor Angela Merkel's spokesman says Germany wants Britain to remain an "active and committed" European Union member but is insisting the principle of free movement of workers within the bloc isn't negotiable.

British Prime Minister David Cameron, facing political pressure from the rise of Britain's anti-EU UKIP party, wants to take steps to limit the level of migration from the EU into Britain.

German weekly Der Spiegel reported Sunday, without identifying sources, that German officials could envision giving up efforts to keep Britain in the EU if Cameron insists on limits.

Merkel spokesman Steffen Seibert said Monday that Germany isn't considering "hypothetical" scenarios. He says Germany shares an interest in fighting "possible abuse" of free movement of labor but the overall principle mustn't be questioned.