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Leader of Nigeria's Islamic extremists denies cease-fire, says all kidnapped girls married off

  • FILE - This Monday May. 12, 2014 file image taken from video by Nigeria's Boko Haram terrorist network, shows the alleged missing girls abducted from the northeastern town of Chibok. The leader of Nigeria's Islamic extremist group Boko Haram has denied agreeing to any cease-fire with the government and said Friday Oct. 31, 2014 the more than 200 kidnapped schoolgirls all have converted to Islam and been married off.  (AP Photo/File)

    FILE - This Monday May. 12, 2014 file image taken from video by Nigeria's Boko Haram terrorist network, shows the alleged missing girls abducted from the northeastern town of Chibok. The leader of Nigeria's Islamic extremist group Boko Haram has denied agreeing to any cease-fire with the government and said Friday Oct. 31, 2014 the more than 200 kidnapped schoolgirls all have converted to Islam and been married off. (AP Photo/File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Monday, May 19, 2014 file photo, Martha Mark, the mother of kidnapped school girl Monica Mark cries as she displays her photo, in the family house, in Chibok, Nigeria. In a new video released late Friday night Oct. 31, 2014, the leader of Nigeria's Islamic extremist group Boko Haram,  Abubakar Shekau dashed hopes for a prisoner exchange to get the girls released. "The issue of the girls is long forgotten because I have long ago married them off," he said, laughing. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba, File)

    FILE - In this Monday, May 19, 2014 file photo, Martha Mark, the mother of kidnapped school girl Monica Mark cries as she displays her photo, in the family house, in Chibok, Nigeria. In a new video released late Friday night Oct. 31, 2014, the leader of Nigeria's Islamic extremist group Boko Haram, Abubakar Shekau dashed hopes for a prisoner exchange to get the girls released. "The issue of the girls is long forgotten because I have long ago married them off," he said, laughing. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this May 12, 2014 file image from video by Nigeria's Boko Haram terrorist network shows their leader Abubakar Shekau speaks to the camera. The leader of Nigeria’s Islamic extremist group Boko Haram denied agreeing to any cease-fire with the government and said more than 200 kidnapped schoolgirls all have converted to Islam and been married off. In a new video released late Friday, Oct. 31, 2014, Abubakar Shekau dashed hopes for a prisoner exchange to get the girls released. “The issue of the girls is long forgotten because I have long ago married them off,” he said, laughing. “In this war, there is no going back.” (AP Photo/File)

    FILE - In this May 12, 2014 file image from video by Nigeria's Boko Haram terrorist network shows their leader Abubakar Shekau speaks to the camera. The leader of Nigeria’s Islamic extremist group Boko Haram denied agreeing to any cease-fire with the government and said more than 200 kidnapped schoolgirls all have converted to Islam and been married off. In a new video released late Friday, Oct. 31, 2014, Abubakar Shekau dashed hopes for a prisoner exchange to get the girls released. “The issue of the girls is long forgotten because I have long ago married them off,” he said, laughing. “In this war, there is no going back.” (AP Photo/File)  (The Associated Press)

The leader of Nigeria's Islamic extremist group denies agreeing to a cease-fire and says more than 200 kidnapped schoolgirls all have converted to Islam and been married off.

Abubakar Shekau dashed hopes for a prisoner exchange to get the girls released and says "in this war, there is no going back." He spoke in a video released late Friday night and received by The Associated Press in the same way as previous messages.

Nigeria's military chief on Oct. 17 announced that Boko Haram had agreed to an immediate cease-fire to end a five-year insurgency that has killed thousands and driven hundreds of thousands from their homes in northeast Nigeria.

But attacks and abductions have continued. Boko Haram's kidnapping of more than 200 schoolgirls in April prompted an international protest campaign.