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Families of British aid workers slain by IS in Syria call for 'acts of unity' against terror

  • Barbara Henning, the widow of Alan Henning,  stands with Michael Haines, the brother of David Haines, the two British aid workers killed by Islamic  State group militants, outside the Perth Congregational Church in Perth Scotland Saturday Oct. 18, 2014   prior to a memorial service for David Haines.  Families of  the two British aid workers killed by the Islamic State group in Syria have urged people of all faiths to unite against the militants' "hateful acts." In a letter published Saturday in the Guardian newspaper, Barbara Henning and Michael Haines urged everyone "to find a single act of unity _ one simple gesture, one act, one moment _ that draws people together." (AP Photo/Danny Lawson/PA) UNITED KINGDOM OUT

    Barbara Henning, the widow of Alan Henning, stands with Michael Haines, the brother of David Haines, the two British aid workers killed by Islamic State group militants, outside the Perth Congregational Church in Perth Scotland Saturday Oct. 18, 2014 prior to a memorial service for David Haines. Families of the two British aid workers killed by the Islamic State group in Syria have urged people of all faiths to unite against the militants' "hateful acts." In a letter published Saturday in the Guardian newspaper, Barbara Henning and Michael Haines urged everyone "to find a single act of unity _ one simple gesture, one act, one moment _ that draws people together." (AP Photo/Danny Lawson/PA) UNITED KINGDOM OUT  (The Associated Press)

  • Barbara Henning, the widow of Alan Henning,  stands with Michael Haines, the brother of David Haines, the two British aid workers killed by Islamic  State group militants, outside the Perth Congregational Church in Perth Scotland Saturday Oct. 18, 2014   prior to a memorial service for David Haines.  Families of  the two British aid workers killed by the Islamic State group in Syria have urged people of all faiths to unite against the militants' "hateful acts." In a letter published Saturday in the Guardian newspaper, Barbara Henning and Michael Haines urged everyone "to find a single act of unity _ one simple gesture, one act, one moment _ that draws people together." (AP Photo/Danny Lawson/PA) UNITED KINGDOM OUT

    Barbara Henning, the widow of Alan Henning, stands with Michael Haines, the brother of David Haines, the two British aid workers killed by Islamic State group militants, outside the Perth Congregational Church in Perth Scotland Saturday Oct. 18, 2014 prior to a memorial service for David Haines. Families of the two British aid workers killed by the Islamic State group in Syria have urged people of all faiths to unite against the militants' "hateful acts." In a letter published Saturday in the Guardian newspaper, Barbara Henning and Michael Haines urged everyone "to find a single act of unity _ one simple gesture, one act, one moment _ that draws people together." (AP Photo/Danny Lawson/PA) UNITED KINGDOM OUT  (The Associated Press)

Families of two British aid workers killed by the Islamic State group in Syria say people of all faiths should unite against the militants' "hateful acts."

In a letter to The Guardian newspaper, Barbara Henning and Michael Haines urged everyone "to find a single act of unity — one simple gesture, one act, one moment — that draws people together."

Barbara Henning's husband Alan and Michael Haines' brother David are two of the Western hostages beheaded on IS videos.

A memorial service is being held for Haines Saturday in his hometown of Perth, Scotland.

In a video message, Michael Haines remembered him as "a man full of kindness, open and caring, willing to cross the road to help others."

The militants have also killed two Americans and threatened a third.