World

Algerian police refuse to abandon protest at presidential headquarters

  • Members of Algeria’s police demonstrate outside the Algerian presidency, seen in background, in Algiers, Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014. Algerian police have marched to the president’s headquarters in an unusual protest movement prompted by attacks on security forces. The attacks on police in southern Algeria and subsequent protests come amid concerns that President Abdelaziz Bouteflika is too ill to rule Africa’s largest country.  (AP Photo/Sidali Djarboub)

    Members of Algeria’s police demonstrate outside the Algerian presidency, seen in background, in Algiers, Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014. Algerian police have marched to the president’s headquarters in an unusual protest movement prompted by attacks on security forces. The attacks on police in southern Algeria and subsequent protests come amid concerns that President Abdelaziz Bouteflika is too ill to rule Africa’s largest country. (AP Photo/Sidali Djarboub)  (The Associated Press)

  • Members of the Republican Guard, background, stand guard outside the president's headquarters in the Algerian capital, Algiers, as police forces stage a protest next to the building, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014. The police protest was in its third day Thursday amid questions about Abdelaziz Bouteflika’s whereabouts and his fitness to run his large, gas-rich country. The police are angry over riots and attacks on their colleagues, and want better pay and more political support. (AP Photo/Sidali Djarboub)

    Members of the Republican Guard, background, stand guard outside the president's headquarters in the Algerian capital, Algiers, as police forces stage a protest next to the building, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014. The police protest was in its third day Thursday amid questions about Abdelaziz Bouteflika’s whereabouts and his fitness to run his large, gas-rich country. The police are angry over riots and attacks on their colleagues, and want better pay and more political support. (AP Photo/Sidali Djarboub)  (The Associated Press)

  • Members of the Republican Guard stand guard outside the president's headquarters in the Algerian capital, Algiers, as police forces stage a protest next to the building, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014. The police protest was in its third day Thursday amid questions about Abdelaziz Bouteflika’s whereabouts and his fitness to run his large, gas-rich country. The police are angry over riots and attacks on their colleagues, and want better pay and more political support. (AP Photo/Sidali Djarboub)

    Members of the Republican Guard stand guard outside the president's headquarters in the Algerian capital, Algiers, as police forces stage a protest next to the building, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014. The police protest was in its third day Thursday amid questions about Abdelaziz Bouteflika’s whereabouts and his fitness to run his large, gas-rich country. The police are angry over riots and attacks on their colleagues, and want better pay and more political support. (AP Photo/Sidali Djarboub)  (The Associated Press)

Algerian soldiers are protecting the president's office from police camped out nearby in a highly unusual demonstration of anger at the country's leadership.

The police protest entered its third day Thursday amid questions about President Abdelaziz Bouteflika's whereabouts and his fitness to run his large, gas-rich country. The police are angry over riots and attacks on their colleagues, and want better pay and more political support.

About 200 police camped out near the president's headquarters, where soldiers stood guard. A helicopter circled overhead.

The day before, police tried to force their way into the president's office.

The prime minister met with police representatives Wednesday night and pledged to consider their demands. But some police officers say the promises don't go far enough, and refuse to return to work.