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No late-night parties for Malala after teen was awarded Nobel Peace Prize

Female supporters of Pakistan People's Party cut a cake to celebrate Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai, who survived the Taliban's attack, at a ceremony in Islamabad, Pakistan, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014. Taliban attack survivor Malala became the youngest Nobel winner ever as she and Kailash Satyarthi of India won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for working to protect children from slavery, extremism and child labor at great risk to their own lives. (AP Photo/Anjum Naveed)

Female supporters of Pakistan People's Party cut a cake to celebrate Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai, who survived the Taliban's attack, at a ceremony in Islamabad, Pakistan, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014. Taliban attack survivor Malala became the youngest Nobel winner ever as she and Kailash Satyarthi of India won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for working to protect children from slavery, extremism and child labor at great risk to their own lives. (AP Photo/Anjum Naveed)  (The Associated Press)

The co-author of Malala Yousafzai's memoir says there were no late-night parties for the teenage Nobel Peace Prize winner after she was honored for her work supporting girls' rights to education.

Instead, Christina Lamb says, Malala spent the night after she won the prestigious prize nursing a cold and watching Pakistani television with her parents at home in Birmingham in central England.

Lamb said in the Sunday Times that 17-year-old Malala is worried that she will fall behind in her school work and exam preparation because she will have to travel to Norway to collect the prize and deliver a speech.

The co-author says Malala allowed herself one indulgence: She answered her phone "Hello, this is the Nobel laureate" instead of with her normal greeting, before bursting into giggles.