World

Hong Kong democracy protest leaders vow to keep up pressure ahead of talks with government

  • A man walks to work in the occupied areas at Central district in Hong Kong, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014. The government and students leaders announced they will begin talks on political reform on Friday. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

    A man walks to work in the occupied areas at Central district in Hong Kong, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014. The government and students leaders announced they will begin talks on political reform on Friday. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)  (The Associated Press)

  • A man walks to work in the occupied areas at Central district in Hong Kong, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014. The government and students leaders announced they will begin talks on political reform on Friday. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

    A man walks to work in the occupied areas at Central district in Hong Kong, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014. The government and students leaders announced they will begin talks on political reform on Friday. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)  (The Associated Press)

  • Police offices inspect some barricades in the occupied areas at Central district in Hong Kong, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014. The government and students leaders announced they will begin talks on political reform on Friday. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

    Police offices inspect some barricades in the occupied areas at Central district in Hong Kong, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014. The government and students leaders announced they will begin talks on political reform on Friday. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)  (The Associated Press)

The leaders of a Hong Kong protest that has occupied main roads for more than a week to press for genuine democratic reforms are stepping up their civil disobedience campaign by a notch as they head into talks with the government.

Protest leaders say they're calling for supporters to bring their tents to camp out Friday at the main protest zone — outside government headquarters, which they're dubbing "Umbrella Square."

Umbrellas used by protesters to deflect police pepper spray and tear gas have become a symbol of the nonviolent movement.

Tens of thousands of protesters have blocked roads to demand the government abandon plans for Beijing to screen candidates for the city's inaugural elections for its leader, though crowd numbers have dwindled this week.