World

As Radovan Karadzic trial ends, the former Bosnian Serb leader says he expects to be acquitted

Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic addresses the court of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in The Hague Netherlands in this image taken from TV, Wednesday Oct. 1, 2014. Karadzic insisted Wednesday that United Nations prosecutors do not have "a shred of evidence" linking him to atrocities throughout the Bosnian war, and accused them of putting the entire Serb people on trial. In an 874-page written brief summarizing his defense, Karadzic said he should not be convicted by the U.N.'s Yugoslav war crimes tribunal, but acknowledged that, as wartime leader of the breakaway Serb entity in Bosnia, he "bears moral responsibility for any crimes committed by citizens and forces of Republika Srpska." (AP Photo/ICTY via Associated Press Television)

Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic addresses the court of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in The Hague Netherlands in this image taken from TV, Wednesday Oct. 1, 2014. Karadzic insisted Wednesday that United Nations prosecutors do not have "a shred of evidence" linking him to atrocities throughout the Bosnian war, and accused them of putting the entire Serb people on trial. In an 874-page written brief summarizing his defense, Karadzic said he should not be convicted by the U.N.'s Yugoslav war crimes tribunal, but acknowledged that, as wartime leader of the breakaway Serb entity in Bosnia, he "bears moral responsibility for any crimes committed by citizens and forces of Republika Srpska." (AP Photo/ICTY via Associated Press Television)  (The Associated Press)

Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic says he expects to be acquitted of genocide and all other charges as his five-year war crimes trial wrapped up and judges retired to begin considering their verdicts.

Karadzic is charged with orchestrating atrocities by Bosnian Serb forces throughout the 1992-95 Bosnian war, ranging from a deadly campaign of sniping and shelling in the capital, Sarajevo, to the 1995 murders of 8,000 Muslim men and boys in Srebrenica.

In his final comments to a three-judge panel at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, Karadzic said Tuesday that "The war did not happen as I wanted it."

The conflict left 100,000 dead and forced thousands more to flee their homes.

Judges are expected to take months to reach verdicts.