World

Eid celebrations low key in Indian-held Kashmir after flooding; anti-India protests break out

  • A boy walks with a sheep after buy it from a market ahead of the Muslim festival Eid al-Adha, in Srinagar, Indian-controlled Kashmir, Sunday, Oct.5, 2014.Muslims are marking the Eid al-Adha, that commemorates the willingness of the prophet Ibrahim to sacrifice his son in accordance with God's will, though in the end God provides him a sheep to sacrifice instead. On the start of Eid al-Adha, Muslims slaughter sheep, cattle and other livestock, and give part of the meat to the poor. (AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan)

    A boy walks with a sheep after buy it from a market ahead of the Muslim festival Eid al-Adha, in Srinagar, Indian-controlled Kashmir, Sunday, Oct.5, 2014.Muslims are marking the Eid al-Adha, that commemorates the willingness of the prophet Ibrahim to sacrifice his son in accordance with God's will, though in the end God provides him a sheep to sacrifice instead. On the start of Eid al-Adha, Muslims slaughter sheep, cattle and other livestock, and give part of the meat to the poor. (AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan)  (The Associated Press)

  • A young sheep vendor feeds a sheep as he awaits customers at a market ahead of the Muslim festival Eid al-Adha, in Srinagar, Indian-controlled Kashmir, Sunday, Oct.5, 2014.Muslims are marking the Eid al-Adha, that commemorates the willingness of the prophet Ibrahim to sacrifice his son in accordance with God's will, though in the end God provides him a sheep to sacrifice instead. On the start of Eid al-Adha, Muslims slaughter sheep, cattle and other livestock, and give part of the meat to the poor. (AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan)

    A young sheep vendor feeds a sheep as he awaits customers at a market ahead of the Muslim festival Eid al-Adha, in Srinagar, Indian-controlled Kashmir, Sunday, Oct.5, 2014.Muslims are marking the Eid al-Adha, that commemorates the willingness of the prophet Ibrahim to sacrifice his son in accordance with God's will, though in the end God provides him a sheep to sacrifice instead. On the start of Eid al-Adha, Muslims slaughter sheep, cattle and other livestock, and give part of the meat to the poor. (AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan)  (The Associated Press)

  • A Kashmiri Muslim man stretches his arms as he prays during Eid al-Adha in Srinagar, India, Monday, Oct. 6, 2014. Eid al-Adha is a religious festival celebrated by Muslims worldwide to commemorate the willingness of Prophet Ibrahim to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God. (AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan)

    A Kashmiri Muslim man stretches his arms as he prays during Eid al-Adha in Srinagar, India, Monday, Oct. 6, 2014. Eid al-Adha is a religious festival celebrated by Muslims worldwide to commemorate the willingness of Prophet Ibrahim to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God. (AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan)  (The Associated Press)

Police say anti-India protests erupted in Indian-controlled Kashmir during celebrations marking the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha that were subdued due to flooding that devastated much of the region.

Many in the disputed territory are angry over perceived neglect by India in helping the region recover after floods last month killed at least 281 people and caused about $17 billion in damage.

Kashmiris usually mark the Eid festival with fireworks, parties and prayer meetings, but this year few vendors were selling toys and fewer animals were sacrificed to honor the Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son as commanded by God.

Hundreds rallied Monday against India's control over the region, hurling rocks and bricks at law enforcement officers, who retaliated by swinging batons and firing tear gas into the crowds.